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Lipid levels and the risk of ischemic stroke in women.
Neurology 2007; 68(8):556-62Neur

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the association between total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), total cholesterol to HDL-C ratio, and non-HDL-C with the risk of ischemic stroke in a large cohort of apparently healthy women.

METHODS

Prospective cohort study among 27,937 US women aged > or =45 years participating in the Women's Health Study who provided baseline blood samples. Stroke occurrence was self-reported and confirmed by medical record review. We categorized plasma lipid measurements into quintiles. We used Cox proportional hazards models to evaluate the association between lipids and risk of ischemic stroke.

RESULTS

During 11 years of follow-up, 282 ischemic strokes occurred. All lipid levels were strongly associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke in age-adjusted models. The association attenuated particularly for HDL-C after adjustment for potential confounders. For the comparison of the highest to the lowest quintile, the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (95% CI; p for trend across mean quintile values) of ischemic stroke were 2.27 (1.43, 3.60; p(trend) < 0.001) for total cholesterol; 1.74 (1.14, 2.66; p(trend) = 0.003) for LDL-C; 0.78 (0.52, 1.17; p(trend) = 0.27) for HDL-C; 1.65 (1.06, 2.58; p(trend) = 0.02) for the total cholesterol to HDL-C ratio; and 2.45 (1.54, 3.91; p(trend) < 0.001) for non-HDL-C.

CONCLUSIONS

In this large cohort of apparently healthy women, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, the total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were significantly associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Brigham and Women's Hospital, Division of Preventive Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA. tkurth@rics.bwh.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17310025

Citation

Kurth, T, et al. "Lipid Levels and the Risk of Ischemic Stroke in Women." Neurology, vol. 68, no. 8, 2007, pp. 556-62.
Kurth T, Everett BM, Buring JE, et al. Lipid levels and the risk of ischemic stroke in women. Neurology. 2007;68(8):556-62.
Kurth, T., Everett, B. M., Buring, J. E., Kase, C. S., Ridker, P. M., & Gaziano, J. M. (2007). Lipid levels and the risk of ischemic stroke in women. Neurology, 68(8), pp. 556-62.
Kurth T, et al. Lipid Levels and the Risk of Ischemic Stroke in Women. Neurology. 2007 Feb 20;68(8):556-62. PubMed PMID: 17310025.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lipid levels and the risk of ischemic stroke in women. AU - Kurth,T, AU - Everett,B M, AU - Buring,J E, AU - Kase,C S, AU - Ridker,P M, AU - Gaziano,J M, PY - 2007/2/21/pubmed PY - 2007/3/22/medline PY - 2007/2/21/entrez SP - 556 EP - 62 JF - Neurology JO - Neurology VL - 68 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), total cholesterol to HDL-C ratio, and non-HDL-C with the risk of ischemic stroke in a large cohort of apparently healthy women. METHODS: Prospective cohort study among 27,937 US women aged > or =45 years participating in the Women's Health Study who provided baseline blood samples. Stroke occurrence was self-reported and confirmed by medical record review. We categorized plasma lipid measurements into quintiles. We used Cox proportional hazards models to evaluate the association between lipids and risk of ischemic stroke. RESULTS: During 11 years of follow-up, 282 ischemic strokes occurred. All lipid levels were strongly associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke in age-adjusted models. The association attenuated particularly for HDL-C after adjustment for potential confounders. For the comparison of the highest to the lowest quintile, the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (95% CI; p for trend across mean quintile values) of ischemic stroke were 2.27 (1.43, 3.60; p(trend) < 0.001) for total cholesterol; 1.74 (1.14, 2.66; p(trend) = 0.003) for LDL-C; 0.78 (0.52, 1.17; p(trend) = 0.27) for HDL-C; 1.65 (1.06, 2.58; p(trend) = 0.02) for the total cholesterol to HDL-C ratio; and 2.45 (1.54, 3.91; p(trend) < 0.001) for non-HDL-C. CONCLUSIONS: In this large cohort of apparently healthy women, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, the total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were significantly associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke. SN - 1526-632X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17310025/Lipid_levels_and_the_risk_of_ischemic_stroke_in_women_ L2 - http://www.neurology.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=17310025 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -