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Increased satiety after intake of a chocolate milk drink compared with a carbonated beverage, but no difference in subsequent ad libitum lunch intake.
Br J Nutr. 2007 Mar; 97(3):579-83.BJ

Abstract

The rising rate of obesity has been blamed on increased consumption of sugar-sweetened soft drinks, such as carbonated sodas, which fail to satisfy hunger. The objective of the present study was to compare the effect on appetite and energy intake of a sugar-sweetened beverage (cola) and a chocolate milk drink, matched for energy content and volume. It was hypothesised that chocolate milk may be more satiating because of its protein content. Twenty-two healthy young men (age 23 (SD 1 x 8) years) of normal weight (BMI 22 x 2 (SD 1 x 5) kg/m2) were recruited to the randomised cross-over study. Visual analogue scales were used to record subjective appetite ratings every 30 min on each of two test days. A drink of 500 ml cola or chocolate milk (900 kJ) was ingested 30 min before an ad libitum lunch. Satiety and fullness were significantly greater (P=0 x 0007, P=0 x 0004, respectively) 30 min after chocolate milk than after cola. Ratings of prospective consumption and hunger were significantly greater after cola than after chocolate milk, both immediately after preload intake (P=0 x 008, P=0 x 01, respectively) and 30 min afterwards (P=0 x 004, P=0 x 01, respectively). There was no significant difference (P=0 x 42) in ad libitum lunch intake after ingestion of chocolate milk (3145 (SD 1268) kJ) compared with cola (3286 (SD 1346) kJ). The results support the hypothesis that sweetened soft drinks are different from milk products in their impact on short-term hunger and satiety, although differences in subjective appetite scores were not translated into differences in energy intake.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Human Nutrition, Centre for Advanced Food Studies, the Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg, Denmark. ahrp@novonordisk.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17313721

Citation

Harper, Angela, et al. "Increased Satiety After Intake of a Chocolate Milk Drink Compared With a Carbonated Beverage, but No Difference in Subsequent Ad Libitum Lunch Intake." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 97, no. 3, 2007, pp. 579-83.
Harper A, James A, Flint A, et al. Increased satiety after intake of a chocolate milk drink compared with a carbonated beverage, but no difference in subsequent ad libitum lunch intake. Br J Nutr. 2007;97(3):579-83.
Harper, A., James, A., Flint, A., & Astrup, A. (2007). Increased satiety after intake of a chocolate milk drink compared with a carbonated beverage, but no difference in subsequent ad libitum lunch intake. The British Journal of Nutrition, 97(3), 579-83.
Harper A, et al. Increased Satiety After Intake of a Chocolate Milk Drink Compared With a Carbonated Beverage, but No Difference in Subsequent Ad Libitum Lunch Intake. Br J Nutr. 2007;97(3):579-83. PubMed PMID: 17313721.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Increased satiety after intake of a chocolate milk drink compared with a carbonated beverage, but no difference in subsequent ad libitum lunch intake. AU - Harper,Angela, AU - James,Anita, AU - Flint,Anne, AU - Astrup,Arne, PY - 2007/2/23/pubmed PY - 2007/4/11/medline PY - 2007/2/23/entrez SP - 579 EP - 83 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br. J. Nutr. VL - 97 IS - 3 N2 - The rising rate of obesity has been blamed on increased consumption of sugar-sweetened soft drinks, such as carbonated sodas, which fail to satisfy hunger. The objective of the present study was to compare the effect on appetite and energy intake of a sugar-sweetened beverage (cola) and a chocolate milk drink, matched for energy content and volume. It was hypothesised that chocolate milk may be more satiating because of its protein content. Twenty-two healthy young men (age 23 (SD 1 x 8) years) of normal weight (BMI 22 x 2 (SD 1 x 5) kg/m2) were recruited to the randomised cross-over study. Visual analogue scales were used to record subjective appetite ratings every 30 min on each of two test days. A drink of 500 ml cola or chocolate milk (900 kJ) was ingested 30 min before an ad libitum lunch. Satiety and fullness were significantly greater (P=0 x 0007, P=0 x 0004, respectively) 30 min after chocolate milk than after cola. Ratings of prospective consumption and hunger were significantly greater after cola than after chocolate milk, both immediately after preload intake (P=0 x 008, P=0 x 01, respectively) and 30 min afterwards (P=0 x 004, P=0 x 01, respectively). There was no significant difference (P=0 x 42) in ad libitum lunch intake after ingestion of chocolate milk (3145 (SD 1268) kJ) compared with cola (3286 (SD 1346) kJ). The results support the hypothesis that sweetened soft drinks are different from milk products in their impact on short-term hunger and satiety, although differences in subjective appetite scores were not translated into differences in energy intake. SN - 0007-1145 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17313721/Increased_satiety_after_intake_of_a_chocolate_milk_drink_compared_with_a_carbonated_beverage_but_no_difference_in_subsequent_ad_libitum_lunch_intake_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114507339846/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -