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Prenatal multivitamin supplementation and rates of pediatric cancers: a meta-analysis.
Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2007 May; 81(5):685-91.CP

Abstract

Prenatal supplementation of folic acid has been shown to decrease the risk of several congenital malformations. Several studies have recently suggested a potential protective effect of folic acid on certain pediatric cancers. The protective role of prenatal multivitamins has not been elucidated. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the potential protective effect of prenatal multivitamins on several pediatric cancers. Medline, PubMed, EMBASE, Toxline, Healthstar, and Cochrane databases were searched for studies published in all languages from 1960 to July 2005 on multivitamin supplementation and pediatric cancers. References from all articles collected were reviewed for additional articles. Two blinded independent reviewers assessed the articles for inclusion and exclusion. Rates of cancers in women supplemented with multivitamins were compared with unsupplemented women using a random effects model. Sixty-one articles were identified in the initial search, of which, seven articles met the inclusion criteria. There was an apparent protective effect for leukemia (odds ratio (OR)=0.61, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.50-0.74), pediatric brain tumors (OR=0.73, 95% CI=0.60-0.88) and neuroblastoma (OR=0.53, 95% CI=0.42-0.68). In conclusion, maternal ingestion of prenatal multivitamins is associated with a decreased risk for pediatric brain tumors, neuroblastoma, and leukemia. Presently, it is not known which constituent(s) among the multivitamins confer this protective effect.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toronto, and The Motherisk Program, Division of Clinical Pharmacology/Toxicology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17314929

Citation

Goh, Y I., et al. "Prenatal Multivitamin Supplementation and Rates of Pediatric Cancers: a Meta-analysis." Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, vol. 81, no. 5, 2007, pp. 685-91.
Goh YI, Bollano E, Einarson TR, et al. Prenatal multivitamin supplementation and rates of pediatric cancers: a meta-analysis. Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2007;81(5):685-91.
Goh, Y. I., Bollano, E., Einarson, T. R., & Koren, G. (2007). Prenatal multivitamin supplementation and rates of pediatric cancers: a meta-analysis. Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 81(5), 685-91.
Goh YI, et al. Prenatal Multivitamin Supplementation and Rates of Pediatric Cancers: a Meta-analysis. Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2007;81(5):685-91. PubMed PMID: 17314929.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prenatal multivitamin supplementation and rates of pediatric cancers: a meta-analysis. AU - Goh,Y I, AU - Bollano,E, AU - Einarson,T R, AU - Koren,G, Y1 - 2007/02/21/ PY - 2007/2/23/pubmed PY - 2007/5/16/medline PY - 2007/2/23/entrez SP - 685 EP - 91 JF - Clinical pharmacology and therapeutics JO - Clin Pharmacol Ther VL - 81 IS - 5 N2 - Prenatal supplementation of folic acid has been shown to decrease the risk of several congenital malformations. Several studies have recently suggested a potential protective effect of folic acid on certain pediatric cancers. The protective role of prenatal multivitamins has not been elucidated. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the potential protective effect of prenatal multivitamins on several pediatric cancers. Medline, PubMed, EMBASE, Toxline, Healthstar, and Cochrane databases were searched for studies published in all languages from 1960 to July 2005 on multivitamin supplementation and pediatric cancers. References from all articles collected were reviewed for additional articles. Two blinded independent reviewers assessed the articles for inclusion and exclusion. Rates of cancers in women supplemented with multivitamins were compared with unsupplemented women using a random effects model. Sixty-one articles were identified in the initial search, of which, seven articles met the inclusion criteria. There was an apparent protective effect for leukemia (odds ratio (OR)=0.61, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.50-0.74), pediatric brain tumors (OR=0.73, 95% CI=0.60-0.88) and neuroblastoma (OR=0.53, 95% CI=0.42-0.68). In conclusion, maternal ingestion of prenatal multivitamins is associated with a decreased risk for pediatric brain tumors, neuroblastoma, and leukemia. Presently, it is not known which constituent(s) among the multivitamins confer this protective effect. SN - 0009-9236 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17314929/Prenatal_multivitamin_supplementation_and_rates_of_pediatric_cancers:_a_meta_analysis_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.clpt.6100100 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -