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Homocysteine and electroencephalographic rhythms in Alzheimer disease: a multicentric study.
Neuroscience. 2007 Mar 30; 145(3):942-54.N

Abstract

High plasma concentration of homocysteine is an independent risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), due to microvascular impairment and consequent neural loss [Seshadri S, Beiser A, Selhub J, Jacques PF, Rosenberg IH, D'Agostino RB, Wilson PW, Wolf PA (2002) Plasma homocysteine as a risk factor for dementia and Alzheimer's disease. N Engl J Med 346(7):476-483]. Is high plasma homocysteine level related to slow electroencephalographic (EEG) rhythms in awake resting AD subjects, as a reflection of known relationships between cortical neural loss and these rhythms? To test this hypothesis, we enrolled 34 mild AD patients and 34 subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Enrolled people were then subdivided into four sub-groups of 17 persons: MCI and AD subjects with low homocysteine level (MCI- and AD-, homocysteine level <11 micromol/l); MCI and AD subjects with high homocysteine level (MCI+ and AD+, homocysteine level >or=11 micromol/l). Resting eyes-closed EEG data were recorded. EEG rhythms of interest were delta (2-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha 1 (8-10.5 Hz), alpha 2 (10.5-13 Hz), beta 1 (13-20 Hz), and beta 2 (20-30 Hz). EEG cortical sources were estimated by low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA). Results showed that delta (frontal and temporal), theta (central, frontal, parietal, occipital, and temporal), alpha 1 (parietal, occipital, and temporal), and alpha 2 (parietal and occipital) sources were stronger in magnitude in AD+ than AD- group. Instead, no difference was found between MCI- and MCI+ groups. In conclusion, high plasma homocysteine level is related to unselective increment of cortical delta, theta, and alpha rhythms in mild AD, thus unveiling possible relationships among that level, microvascular concomitants of advanced neurodegenerative processes, and synchronization mechanisms generating EEG rhythms.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Dipartimento di Fisiologia Umana e Farmacologia, Università degli Studi di Roma La Sapienza, Rome, Italy. claudio.babiloni@uniroma1.it <claudio.babiloni@uniroma1.it>No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17321055

Citation

Babiloni, C, et al. "Homocysteine and Electroencephalographic Rhythms in Alzheimer Disease: a Multicentric Study." Neuroscience, vol. 145, no. 3, 2007, pp. 942-54.
Babiloni C, Bosco P, Ghidoni R, et al. Homocysteine and electroencephalographic rhythms in Alzheimer disease: a multicentric study. Neuroscience. 2007;145(3):942-54.
Babiloni, C., Bosco, P., Ghidoni, R., Del Percio, C., Squitti, R., Binetti, G., Benussi, L., Ferri, R., Frisoni, G., Lanuzza, B., Cassetta, E., Anello, G., Gurzì, M., Bartesaghi, S., Lizio, R., Tombini, M., & Rossini, P. M. (2007). Homocysteine and electroencephalographic rhythms in Alzheimer disease: a multicentric study. Neuroscience, 145(3), 942-54.
Babiloni C, et al. Homocysteine and Electroencephalographic Rhythms in Alzheimer Disease: a Multicentric Study. Neuroscience. 2007 Mar 30;145(3):942-54. PubMed PMID: 17321055.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Homocysteine and electroencephalographic rhythms in Alzheimer disease: a multicentric study. AU - Babiloni,C, AU - Bosco,P, AU - Ghidoni,R, AU - Del Percio,C, AU - Squitti,R, AU - Binetti,G, AU - Benussi,L, AU - Ferri,R, AU - Frisoni,G, AU - Lanuzza,B, AU - Cassetta,E, AU - Anello,G, AU - Gurzì,M, AU - Bartesaghi,S, AU - Lizio,R, AU - Tombini,M, AU - Rossini,P M, Y1 - 2007/02/22/ PY - 2006/09/18/received PY - 2006/12/18/revised PY - 2006/12/19/accepted PY - 2007/2/27/pubmed PY - 2007/6/15/medline PY - 2007/2/27/entrez SP - 942 EP - 54 JF - Neuroscience JO - Neuroscience VL - 145 IS - 3 N2 - High plasma concentration of homocysteine is an independent risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), due to microvascular impairment and consequent neural loss [Seshadri S, Beiser A, Selhub J, Jacques PF, Rosenberg IH, D'Agostino RB, Wilson PW, Wolf PA (2002) Plasma homocysteine as a risk factor for dementia and Alzheimer's disease. N Engl J Med 346(7):476-483]. Is high plasma homocysteine level related to slow electroencephalographic (EEG) rhythms in awake resting AD subjects, as a reflection of known relationships between cortical neural loss and these rhythms? To test this hypothesis, we enrolled 34 mild AD patients and 34 subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Enrolled people were then subdivided into four sub-groups of 17 persons: MCI and AD subjects with low homocysteine level (MCI- and AD-, homocysteine level <11 micromol/l); MCI and AD subjects with high homocysteine level (MCI+ and AD+, homocysteine level >or=11 micromol/l). Resting eyes-closed EEG data were recorded. EEG rhythms of interest were delta (2-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha 1 (8-10.5 Hz), alpha 2 (10.5-13 Hz), beta 1 (13-20 Hz), and beta 2 (20-30 Hz). EEG cortical sources were estimated by low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA). Results showed that delta (frontal and temporal), theta (central, frontal, parietal, occipital, and temporal), alpha 1 (parietal, occipital, and temporal), and alpha 2 (parietal and occipital) sources were stronger in magnitude in AD+ than AD- group. Instead, no difference was found between MCI- and MCI+ groups. In conclusion, high plasma homocysteine level is related to unselective increment of cortical delta, theta, and alpha rhythms in mild AD, thus unveiling possible relationships among that level, microvascular concomitants of advanced neurodegenerative processes, and synchronization mechanisms generating EEG rhythms. SN - 0306-4522 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17321055/Homocysteine_and_electroencephalographic_rhythms_in_Alzheimer_disease:_a_multicentric_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0306-4522(06)01752-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -