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Nutrition support using the American Dietetic Association medical nutrition therapy protocol for radiation oncology patients improves dietary intake compared with standard practice.
J Am Diet Assoc. 2007 Mar; 107(3):404-12.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

A randomized controlled trial previously conducted in radiation oncology patients demonstrated that nutrition intervention had a beneficial impact on body weight, nutritional status, and quality of life compared with standard practice, but it did not report on dietary intake data.

OBJECTIVE

To determine the impact of nutrition intervention compared with standard practice on dietary intake in outpatients receiving radiotherapy.

DESIGN

Prospective, randomized, controlled trial.

SUBJECTS

Sixty consecutive radiation oncology outpatients (51 men and nine women; age 61.9+/-14 years [mean+/-standard deviation]).

SETTING

Australian private radiotherapy facility.

INTERVENTION

Patients were randomly assigned to receive either nutrition intervention (n=29) (nutrition counseling following the American Dietetic Association [ADA] medical nutrition therapy [MNT] protocol for radiation oncology) or standard practice (n=31) (general nutrition talk and booklet).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE

Dietary intake (protein, energy, fiber) assessed at baseline and at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after starting radiotherapy.

STATISTICAL ANALYSES

Repeated-measures analysis of variance done on an intention to treat basis.

RESULTS

The nutrition intervention group had a higher mean total energy (P=0.029) and protein intake (P<0.001) compared with the standard practice group. Mean intake per kilogram of body weight for the nutrition intervention group ranged from 28 to 31 kcal/kg/day compared with 25 to 29 kcal/kg/day for the standard practice group (P=0.022). The nutrition intervention group had a higher mean protein intake (1.1 to 1.3 g/kg/day) compared with the standard practice group (1.0 to 1.1 g/kg/day) (P=0.001). Although the change in fiber intake between the groups was not significant, there was a trend in the anticipated direction (P=0.083).

CONCLUSIONS

Intensive nutrition intervention following the ADA MNT protocol results in improved dietary intake compared with standard practice and seems to beneficially impact nutrition-related outcomes previously observed in oncology outpatients receiving radiotherapy. The ADA MNT protocol for radiation oncology is a useful guide to the level of nutrition support required.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute for Health and Biomedical Innovation and School of Public Health, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD, Auistralia. e.isenring@qut.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17324657

Citation

Isenring, Elisabeth A., et al. "Nutrition Support Using the American Dietetic Association Medical Nutrition Therapy Protocol for Radiation Oncology Patients Improves Dietary Intake Compared With Standard Practice." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 107, no. 3, 2007, pp. 404-12.
Isenring EA, Bauer JD, Capra S. Nutrition support using the American Dietetic Association medical nutrition therapy protocol for radiation oncology patients improves dietary intake compared with standard practice. J Am Diet Assoc. 2007;107(3):404-12.
Isenring, E. A., Bauer, J. D., & Capra, S. (2007). Nutrition support using the American Dietetic Association medical nutrition therapy protocol for radiation oncology patients improves dietary intake compared with standard practice. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 107(3), 404-12.
Isenring EA, Bauer JD, Capra S. Nutrition Support Using the American Dietetic Association Medical Nutrition Therapy Protocol for Radiation Oncology Patients Improves Dietary Intake Compared With Standard Practice. J Am Diet Assoc. 2007;107(3):404-12. PubMed PMID: 17324657.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Nutrition support using the American Dietetic Association medical nutrition therapy protocol for radiation oncology patients improves dietary intake compared with standard practice. AU - Isenring,Elisabeth A, AU - Bauer,Judith D, AU - Capra,Sandra, PY - 2005/10/16/received PY - 2007/2/28/pubmed PY - 2007/4/24/medline PY - 2007/2/28/entrez SP - 404 EP - 12 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 107 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: A randomized controlled trial previously conducted in radiation oncology patients demonstrated that nutrition intervention had a beneficial impact on body weight, nutritional status, and quality of life compared with standard practice, but it did not report on dietary intake data. OBJECTIVE: To determine the impact of nutrition intervention compared with standard practice on dietary intake in outpatients receiving radiotherapy. DESIGN: Prospective, randomized, controlled trial. SUBJECTS: Sixty consecutive radiation oncology outpatients (51 men and nine women; age 61.9+/-14 years [mean+/-standard deviation]). SETTING: Australian private radiotherapy facility. INTERVENTION: Patients were randomly assigned to receive either nutrition intervention (n=29) (nutrition counseling following the American Dietetic Association [ADA] medical nutrition therapy [MNT] protocol for radiation oncology) or standard practice (n=31) (general nutrition talk and booklet). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Dietary intake (protein, energy, fiber) assessed at baseline and at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after starting radiotherapy. STATISTICAL ANALYSES: Repeated-measures analysis of variance done on an intention to treat basis. RESULTS: The nutrition intervention group had a higher mean total energy (P=0.029) and protein intake (P<0.001) compared with the standard practice group. Mean intake per kilogram of body weight for the nutrition intervention group ranged from 28 to 31 kcal/kg/day compared with 25 to 29 kcal/kg/day for the standard practice group (P=0.022). The nutrition intervention group had a higher mean protein intake (1.1 to 1.3 g/kg/day) compared with the standard practice group (1.0 to 1.1 g/kg/day) (P=0.001). Although the change in fiber intake between the groups was not significant, there was a trend in the anticipated direction (P=0.083). CONCLUSIONS: Intensive nutrition intervention following the ADA MNT protocol results in improved dietary intake compared with standard practice and seems to beneficially impact nutrition-related outcomes previously observed in oncology outpatients receiving radiotherapy. The ADA MNT protocol for radiation oncology is a useful guide to the level of nutrition support required. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17324657/Nutrition_support_using_the_American_Dietetic_Association_medical_nutrition_therapy_protocol_for_radiation_oncology_patients_improves_dietary_intake_compared_with_standard_practice_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8223(06)02674-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -