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Sources of folate and serum folate levels in older adults.
J Am Diet Assoc 2007; 107(3):495-9JA

Abstract

This study examined dietary folate intake in 173 older adults. A subsample (n=128) also provided data about folic acid from vitamin/mineral supplements and serum folate. Subjects were community-dwelling men and women 60 years of age and older. Overall, this sample had healthful dietary patterns with adequate dietary folate. Mean dietary intake converted to dietary folate equivalents (DFE) was 464 microg DFE/day. However, 20% (n=36) had inadequate and 2% (n=3) had high dietary DFE (>1,000 microg DFE/day). A subsample (n=128) completed a dietary supplement questionnaire and biochemical assessment of folate. Adding folic acid from vitamin/mineral supplements to dietary folate (total DFE), intake increased to 766 microg DFE/day; 13% (n=16) had inadequate, 75% (n=95) had adequate, and 13% (n=13) had high total DFE. No subject with low total DFE reported supplement use, but 94% (n=39) with high total DFE intake did so. In the subsample, all subjects had acceptable serum folate levels (mean serum folate=28.0+/-13.8 ng/mL [63.5+/-31.3 nmol/L]). In conclusion, vitamin/mineral supplements should be included in nutrition assessment of older adults. Older adults may be at risk for inadequate folate intake if their energy intake is low, they do not take a vitamin/mineral supplement, or are not consuming fortified cereals. However, older adults may be at risk for excess folic acid intake if they consume both a supplement and fortified cereals.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Univeristy of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02881, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17324669

Citation

Mulligan, Jessica E., et al. "Sources of Folate and Serum Folate Levels in Older Adults." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 107, no. 3, 2007, pp. 495-9.
Mulligan JE, Greene GW, Caldwell M. Sources of folate and serum folate levels in older adults. J Am Diet Assoc. 2007;107(3):495-9.
Mulligan, J. E., Greene, G. W., & Caldwell, M. (2007). Sources of folate and serum folate levels in older adults. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 107(3), pp. 495-9.
Mulligan JE, Greene GW, Caldwell M. Sources of Folate and Serum Folate Levels in Older Adults. J Am Diet Assoc. 2007;107(3):495-9. PubMed PMID: 17324669.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sources of folate and serum folate levels in older adults. AU - Mulligan,Jessica E, AU - Greene,Geoffrey W, AU - Caldwell,Marjorie, PY - 2005/06/09/received PY - 2007/2/28/pubmed PY - 2007/4/24/medline PY - 2007/2/28/entrez SP - 495 EP - 9 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 107 IS - 3 N2 - This study examined dietary folate intake in 173 older adults. A subsample (n=128) also provided data about folic acid from vitamin/mineral supplements and serum folate. Subjects were community-dwelling men and women 60 years of age and older. Overall, this sample had healthful dietary patterns with adequate dietary folate. Mean dietary intake converted to dietary folate equivalents (DFE) was 464 microg DFE/day. However, 20% (n=36) had inadequate and 2% (n=3) had high dietary DFE (>1,000 microg DFE/day). A subsample (n=128) completed a dietary supplement questionnaire and biochemical assessment of folate. Adding folic acid from vitamin/mineral supplements to dietary folate (total DFE), intake increased to 766 microg DFE/day; 13% (n=16) had inadequate, 75% (n=95) had adequate, and 13% (n=13) had high total DFE. No subject with low total DFE reported supplement use, but 94% (n=39) with high total DFE intake did so. In the subsample, all subjects had acceptable serum folate levels (mean serum folate=28.0+/-13.8 ng/mL [63.5+/-31.3 nmol/L]). In conclusion, vitamin/mineral supplements should be included in nutrition assessment of older adults. Older adults may be at risk for inadequate folate intake if their energy intake is low, they do not take a vitamin/mineral supplement, or are not consuming fortified cereals. However, older adults may be at risk for excess folic acid intake if they consume both a supplement and fortified cereals. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17324669/Sources_of_folate_and_serum_folate_levels_in_older_adults_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8223(06)02668-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -