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Supplementation with soy-protein-rich foods does not enhance weight loss.
J Am Diet Assoc. 2007 Mar; 107(3):500-5.JA

Abstract

The objective of this study was to determine whether a weight-loss diet high in soy-protein-rich foods leads to greater weight loss and reductions in waist circumference, fat mass, and cardiovascular disease risk factors than a control diet. Groups of overweight women (body mass index [calculated as kg/m(2)] of 28 to 33, aged 25 to 49 years) were counseled to decrease their caloric intake by 500 kcal/day for a period of 12 weeks; in addition, the soy-protein-rich group was counseled to consume 15 g soy protein/1,000 kcal daily. Soy-protein-rich foods were provided to subjects. Body weight, waist circumference, percent body fat, fat-free mass, lipids, glucose, and insulin were measured at repeated intervals. Forty-seven women completed the study. Both groups lost a similar amount of weight both when a completers only (-3.18%+/-0.63% vs -4.04%+/-0.95% for soy-protein-rich and control diets, respectively) and a last-observation-carried-forward analysis (-1.93%+/-0.50% vs -2.50%+/-0.67%, for soy-protein-rich and control diets, respectively) were performed. There was no difference between groups in change in percent fat mass (-5.31%+/-1.50% for soy-protein-rich diet vs -3.94%+/-1.68% for control diet), percent fat-free mass, and waist circumference. There was no dietary assignment-by-group interaction on lipid, glucose, and insulin concentrations when analyses were done on completers only or on all subjects using a last-observation-carried-forward approach. Percent change in any of the biochemical parameters studied over the 12-week period was not significantly different between groups. Our results do not lend support to the emerging notion that soy-protein-rich foods could be considered potential functional foods for weight management, in the quantities consumed in this study.

Authors+Show Affiliations

New York Obesity Research Center, St Luke's/Roosevelt Hospital, New York, NY 10026, USA. ms2554@columbia.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17324670

Citation

St-Onge, Marie-Pierre, et al. "Supplementation With Soy-protein-rich Foods Does Not Enhance Weight Loss." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 107, no. 3, 2007, pp. 500-5.
St-Onge MP, Claps N, Wolper C, et al. Supplementation with soy-protein-rich foods does not enhance weight loss. J Am Diet Assoc. 2007;107(3):500-5.
St-Onge, M. P., Claps, N., Wolper, C., & Heymsfield, S. B. (2007). Supplementation with soy-protein-rich foods does not enhance weight loss. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 107(3), 500-5.
St-Onge MP, et al. Supplementation With Soy-protein-rich Foods Does Not Enhance Weight Loss. J Am Diet Assoc. 2007;107(3):500-5. PubMed PMID: 17324670.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Supplementation with soy-protein-rich foods does not enhance weight loss. AU - St-Onge,Marie-Pierre, AU - Claps,Nancy, AU - Wolper,Carla, AU - Heymsfield,Steven B, PY - 2005/09/12/received PY - 2007/2/28/pubmed PY - 2007/4/24/medline PY - 2007/2/28/entrez SP - 500 EP - 5 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 107 IS - 3 N2 - The objective of this study was to determine whether a weight-loss diet high in soy-protein-rich foods leads to greater weight loss and reductions in waist circumference, fat mass, and cardiovascular disease risk factors than a control diet. Groups of overweight women (body mass index [calculated as kg/m(2)] of 28 to 33, aged 25 to 49 years) were counseled to decrease their caloric intake by 500 kcal/day for a period of 12 weeks; in addition, the soy-protein-rich group was counseled to consume 15 g soy protein/1,000 kcal daily. Soy-protein-rich foods were provided to subjects. Body weight, waist circumference, percent body fat, fat-free mass, lipids, glucose, and insulin were measured at repeated intervals. Forty-seven women completed the study. Both groups lost a similar amount of weight both when a completers only (-3.18%+/-0.63% vs -4.04%+/-0.95% for soy-protein-rich and control diets, respectively) and a last-observation-carried-forward analysis (-1.93%+/-0.50% vs -2.50%+/-0.67%, for soy-protein-rich and control diets, respectively) were performed. There was no difference between groups in change in percent fat mass (-5.31%+/-1.50% for soy-protein-rich diet vs -3.94%+/-1.68% for control diet), percent fat-free mass, and waist circumference. There was no dietary assignment-by-group interaction on lipid, glucose, and insulin concentrations when analyses were done on completers only or on all subjects using a last-observation-carried-forward approach. Percent change in any of the biochemical parameters studied over the 12-week period was not significantly different between groups. Our results do not lend support to the emerging notion that soy-protein-rich foods could be considered potential functional foods for weight management, in the quantities consumed in this study. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17324670/Supplementation_with_soy_protein_rich_foods_does_not_enhance_weight_loss_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8223(06)02669-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -