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Long-term psychological and occupational effects of providing hospital healthcare during SARS outbreak.
Emerg Infect Dis. 2006 Dec; 12(12):1924-32.EI

Abstract

Healthcare workers (HCWs) found the 2003 outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) to be stressful, but the long-term impact is not known. From 13 to 26 months after the SARS outbreak, 769 HCWs at 9 Toronto hospitals that treated SARS patients and 4 Hamilton hospitals that did not treat SARS patients completed a survey of several adverse outcomes. Toronto HCWs reported significantly higher levels of burnout (p = 0.019), psychological distress (p<0.001), and posttraumatic stress (p<0.001). Toronto workers were more likely to have reduced patient contact and work hours and to report behavioral consequences of stress. Variance in adverse outcomes was explained by a protective effect of the perceived adequacy of training and support and by a provocative effect of maladaptive coping style and other individual factors. The results reinforce the value of effective staff support and training in preparation for future outbreaks.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. rmaunder@mtsinai.on.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17326946

Citation

Maunder, Robert G., et al. "Long-term Psychological and Occupational Effects of Providing Hospital Healthcare During SARS Outbreak." Emerging Infectious Diseases, vol. 12, no. 12, 2006, pp. 1924-32.
Maunder RG, Lancee WJ, Balderson KE, et al. Long-term psychological and occupational effects of providing hospital healthcare during SARS outbreak. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(12):1924-32.
Maunder, R. G., Lancee, W. J., Balderson, K. E., Bennett, J. P., Borgundvaag, B., Evans, S., Fernandes, C. M., Goldbloom, D. S., Gupta, M., Hunter, J. J., McGillis Hall, L., Nagle, L. M., Pain, C., Peczeniuk, S. S., Raymond, G., Read, N., Rourke, S. B., Steinberg, R. J., Stewart, T. E., ... Wasylenki, D. A. (2006). Long-term psychological and occupational effects of providing hospital healthcare during SARS outbreak. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(12), 1924-32.
Maunder RG, et al. Long-term Psychological and Occupational Effects of Providing Hospital Healthcare During SARS Outbreak. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006;12(12):1924-32. PubMed PMID: 17326946.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Long-term psychological and occupational effects of providing hospital healthcare during SARS outbreak. AU - Maunder,Robert G, AU - Lancee,William J, AU - Balderson,Kenneth E, AU - Bennett,Jocelyn P, AU - Borgundvaag,Bjug, AU - Evans,Susan, AU - Fernandes,Christopher M B, AU - Goldbloom,David S, AU - Gupta,Mona, AU - Hunter,Jonathan J, AU - McGillis Hall,Linda, AU - Nagle,Lynn M, AU - Pain,Clare, AU - Peczeniuk,Sonia S, AU - Raymond,Glenna, AU - Read,Nancy, AU - Rourke,Sean B, AU - Steinberg,Rosalie J, AU - Stewart,Thomas E, AU - VanDeVelde-Coke,Susan, AU - Veldhorst,Georgina G, AU - Wasylenki,Donald A, PY - 2007/3/1/pubmed PY - 2007/4/27/medline PY - 2007/3/1/entrez SP - 1924 EP - 32 JF - Emerging infectious diseases JO - Emerg Infect Dis VL - 12 IS - 12 N2 - Healthcare workers (HCWs) found the 2003 outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) to be stressful, but the long-term impact is not known. From 13 to 26 months after the SARS outbreak, 769 HCWs at 9 Toronto hospitals that treated SARS patients and 4 Hamilton hospitals that did not treat SARS patients completed a survey of several adverse outcomes. Toronto HCWs reported significantly higher levels of burnout (p = 0.019), psychological distress (p<0.001), and posttraumatic stress (p<0.001). Toronto workers were more likely to have reduced patient contact and work hours and to report behavioral consequences of stress. Variance in adverse outcomes was explained by a protective effect of the perceived adequacy of training and support and by a provocative effect of maladaptive coping style and other individual factors. The results reinforce the value of effective staff support and training in preparation for future outbreaks. SN - 1080-6040 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17326946/Long_term_psychological_and_occupational_effects_of_providing_hospital_healthcare_during_SARS_outbreak_ L2 - https://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/eid/vol12no12/06-0584.htm DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -