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Association of television viewing with fasting and 2-h postchallenge plasma glucose levels in adults without diagnosed diabetes.
Diabetes Care 2007; 30(3):516-22DC

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

We examined the associations of television viewing time with fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and 2-h postchallenge plasma glucose (2-h PG) levels in Australian adults.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS

A total of 8,357 adults aged > 35 years who were free from diagnosed diabetes and who attended a population-based cross-sectional study (Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle Study [AusDiab]) were evaluated. Measures of FPG and 2-h PG were obtained from an oral glucose tolerance test. Self-reported television viewing time (in the previous week) was assessed using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) of insulin sensitivity (HOMA-%S) and beta-cell function (HOMA-%B) were calculated based on fasting glucose and insulin concentrations.

RESULTS

After adjustment for confounders and physical activity time, time spent watching television in women was positively associated with 2-h PG, log fasting insulin, and log HOMA-%B and inversely associated with log HOMA-%S (P < 0.05) but not with FPG. No significant associations were observed with glycemic measures in men. The beta-coefficients across categories of average hours spent watching television per day (< 1.0, 1.0-1.9, 2.0-2.9, 3.0-3.9, and > or = 4.0) for 2-h PG in women were 0 (reference), 0.009, 0.047, 0.473, and 0.501, respectively (P for trend = 0.02).

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings highlight the unique deleterious relationship of sedentary behavior (indicated by television viewing time) and glycemic measures independent of physical activity time and adiposity status. These relationships differed according to sex and type of glucose measurement, with the 2-h PG measure being more strongly associated with television viewing. The findings suggest an important role for reducing sedentary behavior in the prevention of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, especially in women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

International Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Australia. ddunstan@idi.org.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17327314

Citation

Dunstan, David W., et al. "Association of Television Viewing With Fasting and 2-h Postchallenge Plasma Glucose Levels in Adults Without Diagnosed Diabetes." Diabetes Care, vol. 30, no. 3, 2007, pp. 516-22.
Dunstan DW, Salmon J, Healy GN, et al. Association of television viewing with fasting and 2-h postchallenge plasma glucose levels in adults without diagnosed diabetes. Diabetes Care. 2007;30(3):516-22.
Dunstan, D. W., Salmon, J., Healy, G. N., Shaw, J. E., Jolley, D., Zimmet, P. Z., & Owen, N. (2007). Association of television viewing with fasting and 2-h postchallenge plasma glucose levels in adults without diagnosed diabetes. Diabetes Care, 30(3), pp. 516-22.
Dunstan DW, et al. Association of Television Viewing With Fasting and 2-h Postchallenge Plasma Glucose Levels in Adults Without Diagnosed Diabetes. Diabetes Care. 2007;30(3):516-22. PubMed PMID: 17327314.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association of television viewing with fasting and 2-h postchallenge plasma glucose levels in adults without diagnosed diabetes. AU - Dunstan,David W, AU - Salmon,Jo, AU - Healy,Genevieve N, AU - Shaw,Jonathan E, AU - Jolley,Damien, AU - Zimmet,Paul Z, AU - Owen,Neville, AU - ,, PY - 2007/3/1/pubmed PY - 2007/4/28/medline PY - 2007/3/1/entrez SP - 516 EP - 22 JF - Diabetes care JO - Diabetes Care VL - 30 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: We examined the associations of television viewing time with fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and 2-h postchallenge plasma glucose (2-h PG) levels in Australian adults. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A total of 8,357 adults aged > 35 years who were free from diagnosed diabetes and who attended a population-based cross-sectional study (Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle Study [AusDiab]) were evaluated. Measures of FPG and 2-h PG were obtained from an oral glucose tolerance test. Self-reported television viewing time (in the previous week) was assessed using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) of insulin sensitivity (HOMA-%S) and beta-cell function (HOMA-%B) were calculated based on fasting glucose and insulin concentrations. RESULTS: After adjustment for confounders and physical activity time, time spent watching television in women was positively associated with 2-h PG, log fasting insulin, and log HOMA-%B and inversely associated with log HOMA-%S (P < 0.05) but not with FPG. No significant associations were observed with glycemic measures in men. The beta-coefficients across categories of average hours spent watching television per day (< 1.0, 1.0-1.9, 2.0-2.9, 3.0-3.9, and > or = 4.0) for 2-h PG in women were 0 (reference), 0.009, 0.047, 0.473, and 0.501, respectively (P for trend = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings highlight the unique deleterious relationship of sedentary behavior (indicated by television viewing time) and glycemic measures independent of physical activity time and adiposity status. These relationships differed according to sex and type of glucose measurement, with the 2-h PG measure being more strongly associated with television viewing. The findings suggest an important role for reducing sedentary behavior in the prevention of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, especially in women. SN - 1935-5548 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17327314/Association_of_television_viewing_with_fasting_and_2_h_postchallenge_plasma_glucose_levels_in_adults_without_diagnosed_diabetes_ L2 - http://care.diabetesjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=17327314 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -