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Shame and implicit self-concept in women with borderline personality disorder.
Am J Psychiatry. 2007 Mar; 164(3):500-8.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Shame is considered to be a central emotion in borderline personality disorder and to be related to self-injurious behavior, chronic suicidality, and anger-hostility. However, its level and impact on people with borderline personality disorder are largely unknown. The authors examined levels of self-reported shame, guilt, anxiety, and implicit shame-related self-concept in women with borderline personality disorder and assessed the association of shame with self-esteem, quality of life, and anger-hostility.

METHOD

Sixty women with borderline personality disorder completed self-report measures of shame- and guilt-proneness, state shame, anxiety, depression, self-esteem, quality of life, and clinical symptoms. Comparison groups consisted of 30 women with social phobia and 60 healthy women. Implicit shame-related self-concept (relative to anxiety) was assessed by the Implicit Association Test.

RESULTS

Women with borderline personality disorder reported higher levels of shame- and guilt-proneness, state shame, and anxiety than women with social phobia and healthy comparison subjects. The implicit self-concept in women with borderline personality disorder was more shame-prone (relative to anxiety-prone) than in women in the comparison groups. After depression was controlled for, shame-proneness was negatively correlated with self-esteem and quality of life and positively correlated with anger-hostility.

CONCLUSIONS

Shame, an emotion that is prominent in women with borderline personality disorder, is associated with the implicit self-concept as well as with poorer quality of life and self-esteem and greater anger-hostility. Psychotherapeutic approaches to borderline personality disorder need to address explicit and implicit aspects of shame.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Freiburg, Hauptstrasse 5, D-79104 Freiburg, Germany. nicolas.ruesch@uniklinik-freiburg.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17329476

Citation

Rüsch, Nicolas, et al. "Shame and Implicit Self-concept in Women With Borderline Personality Disorder." The American Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 164, no. 3, 2007, pp. 500-8.
Rüsch N, Lieb K, Göttler I, et al. Shame and implicit self-concept in women with borderline personality disorder. Am J Psychiatry. 2007;164(3):500-8.
Rüsch, N., Lieb, K., Göttler, I., Hermann, C., Schramm, E., Richter, H., Jacob, G. A., Corrigan, P. W., & Bohus, M. (2007). Shame and implicit self-concept in women with borderline personality disorder. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 164(3), 500-8.
Rüsch N, et al. Shame and Implicit Self-concept in Women With Borderline Personality Disorder. Am J Psychiatry. 2007;164(3):500-8. PubMed PMID: 17329476.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Shame and implicit self-concept in women with borderline personality disorder. AU - Rüsch,Nicolas, AU - Lieb,Klaus, AU - Göttler,Ines, AU - Hermann,Christiane, AU - Schramm,Elisabeth, AU - Richter,Harald, AU - Jacob,Gitta A, AU - Corrigan,Patrick W, AU - Bohus,Martin, PY - 2007/3/3/pubmed PY - 2007/5/18/medline PY - 2007/3/3/entrez SP - 500 EP - 8 JF - The American journal of psychiatry JO - Am J Psychiatry VL - 164 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Shame is considered to be a central emotion in borderline personality disorder and to be related to self-injurious behavior, chronic suicidality, and anger-hostility. However, its level and impact on people with borderline personality disorder are largely unknown. The authors examined levels of self-reported shame, guilt, anxiety, and implicit shame-related self-concept in women with borderline personality disorder and assessed the association of shame with self-esteem, quality of life, and anger-hostility. METHOD: Sixty women with borderline personality disorder completed self-report measures of shame- and guilt-proneness, state shame, anxiety, depression, self-esteem, quality of life, and clinical symptoms. Comparison groups consisted of 30 women with social phobia and 60 healthy women. Implicit shame-related self-concept (relative to anxiety) was assessed by the Implicit Association Test. RESULTS: Women with borderline personality disorder reported higher levels of shame- and guilt-proneness, state shame, and anxiety than women with social phobia and healthy comparison subjects. The implicit self-concept in women with borderline personality disorder was more shame-prone (relative to anxiety-prone) than in women in the comparison groups. After depression was controlled for, shame-proneness was negatively correlated with self-esteem and quality of life and positively correlated with anger-hostility. CONCLUSIONS: Shame, an emotion that is prominent in women with borderline personality disorder, is associated with the implicit self-concept as well as with poorer quality of life and self-esteem and greater anger-hostility. Psychotherapeutic approaches to borderline personality disorder need to address explicit and implicit aspects of shame. SN - 0002-953X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17329476/Shame_and_implicit_self_concept_in_women_with_borderline_personality_disorder_ L2 - https://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/doi/10.1176/ajp.2007.164.3.500?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -