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Cancer incidence among Canadian kidney transplant recipients.
Am J Transplant. 2007 Apr; 7(4):941-8.AJ

Abstract

A number of studies have observed increased cancer incidence rates among individuals who have received renal transplants. Generally, however, these studies have been limited by relatively small sample sizes, short follow-up intervals or focused on only one cancer site. We conducted a nationwide population-based study of 11,155 patients who underwent kidney transplantation between 1981 and 1998. Incident cancers were identified up to December 31, 1999, through record linkage to the Canadian Cancer Registry. Patterns of cancer incidence in the cohort were compared to the Canadian general population using standardized incidence ratios (SIRs). We examined variations in risk according time since transplantation, year of transplantation and age at transplantation. In our patient population, we observed a total of 778 incident cancers versus 313.2 expected (SIR = 2.5, 95% CI = 2.3-2.7). Site-specific SIRs were highest for cancer of the lip (SIR = 31.3, 95% CI = 23.5-40.8), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) (SIR = 8.8, 95% CI = 7.4-10.5), and kidney cancer (SIR = 7.3, 95% CI = 5.7-9.2). SIRs for NHL and cancer of the lip and kidney were highest and among transplant patients. This study confirms previous findings of increased risks of posttransplant cancer. Our findings underscore the need for increased vigilance among kidney transplant recipients for cancers at sites where there are no population-based screening programs in place.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. paul.villeneuve@utoronto.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17331115

Citation

Villeneuve, P J., et al. "Cancer Incidence Among Canadian Kidney Transplant Recipients." American Journal of Transplantation : Official Journal of the American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons, vol. 7, no. 4, 2007, pp. 941-8.
Villeneuve PJ, Schaubel DE, Fenton SS, et al. Cancer incidence among Canadian kidney transplant recipients. Am J Transplant. 2007;7(4):941-8.
Villeneuve, P. J., Schaubel, D. E., Fenton, S. S., Shepherd, F. A., Jiang, Y., & Mao, Y. (2007). Cancer incidence among Canadian kidney transplant recipients. American Journal of Transplantation : Official Journal of the American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons, 7(4), 941-8.
Villeneuve PJ, et al. Cancer Incidence Among Canadian Kidney Transplant Recipients. Am J Transplant. 2007;7(4):941-8. PubMed PMID: 17331115.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cancer incidence among Canadian kidney transplant recipients. AU - Villeneuve,P J, AU - Schaubel,D E, AU - Fenton,S S, AU - Shepherd,F A, AU - Jiang,Y, AU - Mao,Y, Y1 - 2007/02/28/ PY - 2007/3/3/pubmed PY - 2007/8/1/medline PY - 2007/3/3/entrez SP - 941 EP - 8 JF - American journal of transplantation : official journal of the American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons JO - Am J Transplant VL - 7 IS - 4 N2 - A number of studies have observed increased cancer incidence rates among individuals who have received renal transplants. Generally, however, these studies have been limited by relatively small sample sizes, short follow-up intervals or focused on only one cancer site. We conducted a nationwide population-based study of 11,155 patients who underwent kidney transplantation between 1981 and 1998. Incident cancers were identified up to December 31, 1999, through record linkage to the Canadian Cancer Registry. Patterns of cancer incidence in the cohort were compared to the Canadian general population using standardized incidence ratios (SIRs). We examined variations in risk according time since transplantation, year of transplantation and age at transplantation. In our patient population, we observed a total of 778 incident cancers versus 313.2 expected (SIR = 2.5, 95% CI = 2.3-2.7). Site-specific SIRs were highest for cancer of the lip (SIR = 31.3, 95% CI = 23.5-40.8), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) (SIR = 8.8, 95% CI = 7.4-10.5), and kidney cancer (SIR = 7.3, 95% CI = 5.7-9.2). SIRs for NHL and cancer of the lip and kidney were highest and among transplant patients. This study confirms previous findings of increased risks of posttransplant cancer. Our findings underscore the need for increased vigilance among kidney transplant recipients for cancers at sites where there are no population-based screening programs in place. SN - 1600-6135 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17331115/Cancer_incidence_among_Canadian_kidney_transplant_recipients_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -