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Human bocavirus in Italian patients with respiratory diseases.
J Clin Virol. 2007 Apr; 38(4):321-5.JC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

hBoV, a recently discovered parvovirus, can be present in the respiratory tract of patients with acute respiratory diseases (ARD), but its etiologic involvement in the underlying diseases is still uncertain.

OBJECTIVE

To determine in a retrospective study, the prevalence of hBoV, compared with common respiratory viruses (RV), in respiratory specimens from patients with ARD.

STUDY DESIGN

A total of 335 specimens obtained over 7 years were examined. Two hundred were nasal swabs from infants hospitalized for ARD, 84 were nasal swabs or bronchoalveolar lavages from adults with pneumonia, bronchopneumonia or asthma, and 51 were nasal swabs from healthy children.

RESULTS

The overall rate of hBoV detection in specimens from infants with ARD, which was 4.5%, varied slightly from year to year, except for the period 2000-2002, when no specimen was positive. Unlike other RV, no seasonal variation in hBoV incidence was noted. Infants with hBoV infection suffered either from bronchiolitis or from bronchopneumonia and 5 out of 9 cases yielded no co-infecting viral pathogen. Only one sample from an adult was hBoV positive. None of the nasal swabs from healthy subjects tested hBoV-positive.

CONCLUSIONS

The findings indicate that hBoV can cause ARD in infants.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Virology Section and Retrovirus Center, Department of Experimental Pathology, University of Pisa, via San Zeno 37, I-56127 Pisa, Italy.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17336143

Citation

Maggi, Fabrizio, et al. "Human Bocavirus in Italian Patients With Respiratory Diseases." Journal of Clinical Virology : the Official Publication of the Pan American Society for Clinical Virology, vol. 38, no. 4, 2007, pp. 321-5.
Maggi F, Andreoli E, Pifferi M, et al. Human bocavirus in Italian patients with respiratory diseases. J Clin Virol. 2007;38(4):321-5.
Maggi, F., Andreoli, E., Pifferi, M., Meschi, S., Rocchi, J., & Bendinelli, M. (2007). Human bocavirus in Italian patients with respiratory diseases. Journal of Clinical Virology : the Official Publication of the Pan American Society for Clinical Virology, 38(4), 321-5.
Maggi F, et al. Human Bocavirus in Italian Patients With Respiratory Diseases. J Clin Virol. 2007;38(4):321-5. PubMed PMID: 17336143.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Human bocavirus in Italian patients with respiratory diseases. AU - Maggi,Fabrizio, AU - Andreoli,Elisabetta, AU - Pifferi,Massimo, AU - Meschi,Silvia, AU - Rocchi,Jara, AU - Bendinelli,Mauro, Y1 - 2007/03/01/ PY - 2006/08/22/received PY - 2007/01/11/revised PY - 2007/01/23/accepted PY - 2007/3/6/pubmed PY - 2007/10/17/medline PY - 2007/3/6/entrez SP - 321 EP - 5 JF - Journal of clinical virology : the official publication of the Pan American Society for Clinical Virology JO - J Clin Virol VL - 38 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: hBoV, a recently discovered parvovirus, can be present in the respiratory tract of patients with acute respiratory diseases (ARD), but its etiologic involvement in the underlying diseases is still uncertain. OBJECTIVE: To determine in a retrospective study, the prevalence of hBoV, compared with common respiratory viruses (RV), in respiratory specimens from patients with ARD. STUDY DESIGN: A total of 335 specimens obtained over 7 years were examined. Two hundred were nasal swabs from infants hospitalized for ARD, 84 were nasal swabs or bronchoalveolar lavages from adults with pneumonia, bronchopneumonia or asthma, and 51 were nasal swabs from healthy children. RESULTS: The overall rate of hBoV detection in specimens from infants with ARD, which was 4.5%, varied slightly from year to year, except for the period 2000-2002, when no specimen was positive. Unlike other RV, no seasonal variation in hBoV incidence was noted. Infants with hBoV infection suffered either from bronchiolitis or from bronchopneumonia and 5 out of 9 cases yielded no co-infecting viral pathogen. Only one sample from an adult was hBoV positive. None of the nasal swabs from healthy subjects tested hBoV-positive. CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicate that hBoV can cause ARD in infants. SN - 1386-6532 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17336143/Human_bocavirus_in_Italian_patients_with_respiratory_diseases_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1386-6532(07)00043-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -