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Randomized controlled trial of very early mother-infant skin-to-skin contact and breastfeeding status.
J Midwifery Womens Health. 2007 Mar-Apr; 52(2):116-125.JM

Abstract

This study was done to evaluate effects of maternal-infant skin-to-skin contact during the first 2 hours postbirth compared to standard care (holding the infant swaddled in blankets) on breastfeeding outcomes through 1 month follow-up. Healthy primiparous mother-infant dyads were randomly assigned by computerized minimization to skin-to-skin contact (n = 10) or standard care (n = 10). The Infant Breastfeeding Assessment Tool was used to measure success of first breastfeeding and time to effective breastfeeding (time of the first of three consecutive scores of 10-12). Intervention dyads experienced a mean of 1.66 hours of skin-to-skin contact. These infants, compared to swaddled infants, had higher mean sucking competency during the first breastfeeding (8.7 +/- 2.1 vs 6.3 +/- 2.6; P < .02) and achieved effective breastfeeding sooner (935 +/- 721 minutes vs 1737 +/- 1001; P < .04). No significant differences were found in number of breastfeeding problems encountered during follow-up (30.9 +/- 5.51 vs 32.7 +/- 5.84; P < .25) or in breastfeeding exclusivity (1.50 +/- 1.1 vs 2.10 +/- 2.2; P < .45). Sucking competency was also related to maternal nipple protractility (r = .48; P < .03). Very early skin-to-skin contact enhanced breastfeeding success during the early postpartum period. No significant differences were found at 1 month.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Controlled Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17336817

Citation

Moore, Elizabeth R., and Gene Cranston Anderson. "Randomized Controlled Trial of Very Early Mother-infant Skin-to-skin Contact and Breastfeeding Status." Journal of Midwifery & Women's Health, vol. 52, no. 2, 2007, pp. 116-125.
Moore ER, Anderson GC. Randomized controlled trial of very early mother-infant skin-to-skin contact and breastfeeding status. J Midwifery Womens Health. 2007;52(2):116-125.
Moore, E. R., & Anderson, G. C. (2007). Randomized controlled trial of very early mother-infant skin-to-skin contact and breastfeeding status. Journal of Midwifery & Women's Health, 52(2), 116-125. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jmwh.2006.12.002
Moore ER, Anderson GC. Randomized Controlled Trial of Very Early Mother-infant Skin-to-skin Contact and Breastfeeding Status. J Midwifery Womens Health. 2007 Mar-Apr;52(2):116-125. PubMed PMID: 17336817.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Randomized controlled trial of very early mother-infant skin-to-skin contact and breastfeeding status. AU - Moore,Elizabeth R, AU - Anderson,Gene Cranston, PY - 2007/3/6/pubmed PY - 2007/3/29/medline PY - 2007/3/6/entrez SP - 116 EP - 125 JF - Journal of midwifery & women's health JO - J Midwifery Womens Health VL - 52 IS - 2 N2 - This study was done to evaluate effects of maternal-infant skin-to-skin contact during the first 2 hours postbirth compared to standard care (holding the infant swaddled in blankets) on breastfeeding outcomes through 1 month follow-up. Healthy primiparous mother-infant dyads were randomly assigned by computerized minimization to skin-to-skin contact (n = 10) or standard care (n = 10). The Infant Breastfeeding Assessment Tool was used to measure success of first breastfeeding and time to effective breastfeeding (time of the first of three consecutive scores of 10-12). Intervention dyads experienced a mean of 1.66 hours of skin-to-skin contact. These infants, compared to swaddled infants, had higher mean sucking competency during the first breastfeeding (8.7 +/- 2.1 vs 6.3 +/- 2.6; P < .02) and achieved effective breastfeeding sooner (935 +/- 721 minutes vs 1737 +/- 1001; P < .04). No significant differences were found in number of breastfeeding problems encountered during follow-up (30.9 +/- 5.51 vs 32.7 +/- 5.84; P < .25) or in breastfeeding exclusivity (1.50 +/- 1.1 vs 2.10 +/- 2.2; P < .45). Sucking competency was also related to maternal nipple protractility (r = .48; P < .03). Very early skin-to-skin contact enhanced breastfeeding success during the early postpartum period. No significant differences were found at 1 month. SN - 1542-2011 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17336817/Randomized_controlled_trial_of_very_early_mother_infant_skin_to_skin_contact_and_breastfeeding_status_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jmwh.2006.12.002 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -