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Effect of dietary control of urinary uric acid excretion in calcium oxalate stone formers and non-stone-forming controls.
J Endourol. 2007 Feb; 21(2):232-5.JE

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE

Hyperuricosuria is a well-recognized risk factor for calcium oxalate urolithiasis. Some studies have demonstrated elevated urinary uric acid excretion in stone formers compared with non-stone-forming controls; nevertheless, these studies were limited by patient consumption of self-selected diets. With the recognition that dietary differences may induce variations in urinary uric acid excretion, we evaluated excretion of this compound in stone formers and controls consuming a standardized diet.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS

A standardized formula diet was administered to 65 calcium oxalate stone formers and 61 age-matched non-stone-forming controls. During the 3 days of dietary intervention, 24-hour urine collections were obtained. Mean urinary uric acid excretion indexed to urinary creatinine was calculated for each subject, and the results in the two groups were compared.

RESULTS

Stone-forming subjects did not have an elevation in urinary uric excretion compared with control subjects, with mean indexed urinary uric acid excretions of 337 +/- 64 mg/g of creatinine and 379 +/- 76 mg/g of creatinine, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

With dietary standardization, there was no observed increase in urinary uric acid excretion in our sampled populations. These findings emphasize the role of dietary factors in urinary uric acid excretion and highlight the potential value of dietary interventions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Urology, University of Kentucky Chandler Medical Center, Lexington, Kentucky 40536, USA. vmpais2@uky.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17338626

Citation

Pais, Vernon M., et al. "Effect of Dietary Control of Urinary Uric Acid Excretion in Calcium Oxalate Stone Formers and Non-stone-forming Controls." Journal of Endourology, vol. 21, no. 2, 2007, pp. 232-5.
Pais VM, Holmes RP, Assimos DG. Effect of dietary control of urinary uric acid excretion in calcium oxalate stone formers and non-stone-forming controls. J Endourol. 2007;21(2):232-5.
Pais, V. M., Holmes, R. P., & Assimos, D. G. (2007). Effect of dietary control of urinary uric acid excretion in calcium oxalate stone formers and non-stone-forming controls. Journal of Endourology, 21(2), 232-5.
Pais VM, Holmes RP, Assimos DG. Effect of Dietary Control of Urinary Uric Acid Excretion in Calcium Oxalate Stone Formers and Non-stone-forming Controls. J Endourol. 2007;21(2):232-5. PubMed PMID: 17338626.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of dietary control of urinary uric acid excretion in calcium oxalate stone formers and non-stone-forming controls. AU - Pais,Vernon M,Jr AU - Holmes,Ross P, AU - Assimos,Dean G, PY - 2007/3/7/pubmed PY - 2007/4/19/medline PY - 2007/3/7/entrez SP - 232 EP - 5 JF - Journal of endourology JO - J Endourol VL - 21 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Hyperuricosuria is a well-recognized risk factor for calcium oxalate urolithiasis. Some studies have demonstrated elevated urinary uric acid excretion in stone formers compared with non-stone-forming controls; nevertheless, these studies were limited by patient consumption of self-selected diets. With the recognition that dietary differences may induce variations in urinary uric acid excretion, we evaluated excretion of this compound in stone formers and controls consuming a standardized diet. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A standardized formula diet was administered to 65 calcium oxalate stone formers and 61 age-matched non-stone-forming controls. During the 3 days of dietary intervention, 24-hour urine collections were obtained. Mean urinary uric acid excretion indexed to urinary creatinine was calculated for each subject, and the results in the two groups were compared. RESULTS: Stone-forming subjects did not have an elevation in urinary uric excretion compared with control subjects, with mean indexed urinary uric acid excretions of 337 +/- 64 mg/g of creatinine and 379 +/- 76 mg/g of creatinine, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: With dietary standardization, there was no observed increase in urinary uric acid excretion in our sampled populations. These findings emphasize the role of dietary factors in urinary uric acid excretion and highlight the potential value of dietary interventions. SN - 0892-7790 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17338626/Effect_of_dietary_control_of_urinary_uric_acid_excretion_in_calcium_oxalate_stone_formers_and_non_stone_forming_controls_ L2 - https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/end.2007.2218?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -