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Preterm birth-associated cost of early intervention services: an analysis by gestational age.
Pediatrics 2007; 119(4):e866-74Ped

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Characterizing the cost of preterm birth is important in assessing the impact of increasing prematurity rates and evaluating the cost-effectiveness of therapies to prevent preterm delivery. To assess early intervention costs that are associated with preterm births, we estimated the program cost of early intervention services for children who were born in Massachusetts, by gestational age at birth.

METHODS

Using the Pregnancy to Early Life Longitudinal Data Set, birth certificates for infants who were born in Massachusetts between July 1999 and June 2000 were linked to early intervention claims through 2003. We determined total program costs, in 2003 dollars, of early intervention and mean cost per surviving infant by gestational age. Costs by plurality, eligibility criteria, provider discipline, and annual costs for children's first 3 years also were examined.

RESULTS

Overall, 14,033 of 76,901 surviving infants received early intervention services. Program costs totaled almost $66 million, with mean cost per surviving infant of $857. Mean cost per infant was highest for children who were 24 to 31 weeks' gestational age ($5393) and higher for infants who were 32 to 36 weeks' gestational age ($1578) compared with those who were born at term ($725). Cost per surviving infant generally decreased with increasing gestational age. Among children in early intervention, mean cost per child was higher for preterm infants than for term infants. At each gestational age, mean cost per surviving infant was higher for multiples than for singletons, and annual early intervention costs were higher for toddlers than for infants.

CONCLUSIONS

Compared with their term counterparts, preterm infants incurred higher early intervention costs. This information along with data on birth trends will inform budget forecasting for early intervention programs. Costs that are associated with early childhood developmental services must be included when considering the long-term costs of prematurity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Center for Community Health, 250 Washington St, 5th Floor, Boston, MA 02108, USA. karen.clements@state.ma.usNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17339387

Citation

Clements, Karen M., et al. "Preterm Birth-associated Cost of Early Intervention Services: an Analysis By Gestational Age." Pediatrics, vol. 119, no. 4, 2007, pp. e866-74.
Clements KM, Barfield WD, Ayadi MF, et al. Preterm birth-associated cost of early intervention services: an analysis by gestational age. Pediatrics. 2007;119(4):e866-74.
Clements, K. M., Barfield, W. D., Ayadi, M. F., & Wilber, N. (2007). Preterm birth-associated cost of early intervention services: an analysis by gestational age. Pediatrics, 119(4), pp. e866-74.
Clements KM, et al. Preterm Birth-associated Cost of Early Intervention Services: an Analysis By Gestational Age. Pediatrics. 2007;119(4):e866-74. PubMed PMID: 17339387.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Preterm birth-associated cost of early intervention services: an analysis by gestational age. AU - Clements,Karen M, AU - Barfield,Wanda D, AU - Ayadi,M Femi, AU - Wilber,Nancy, Y1 - 2007/03/05/ PY - 2007/3/7/pubmed PY - 2007/4/24/medline PY - 2007/3/7/entrez SP - e866 EP - 74 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 119 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Characterizing the cost of preterm birth is important in assessing the impact of increasing prematurity rates and evaluating the cost-effectiveness of therapies to prevent preterm delivery. To assess early intervention costs that are associated with preterm births, we estimated the program cost of early intervention services for children who were born in Massachusetts, by gestational age at birth. METHODS: Using the Pregnancy to Early Life Longitudinal Data Set, birth certificates for infants who were born in Massachusetts between July 1999 and June 2000 were linked to early intervention claims through 2003. We determined total program costs, in 2003 dollars, of early intervention and mean cost per surviving infant by gestational age. Costs by plurality, eligibility criteria, provider discipline, and annual costs for children's first 3 years also were examined. RESULTS: Overall, 14,033 of 76,901 surviving infants received early intervention services. Program costs totaled almost $66 million, with mean cost per surviving infant of $857. Mean cost per infant was highest for children who were 24 to 31 weeks' gestational age ($5393) and higher for infants who were 32 to 36 weeks' gestational age ($1578) compared with those who were born at term ($725). Cost per surviving infant generally decreased with increasing gestational age. Among children in early intervention, mean cost per child was higher for preterm infants than for term infants. At each gestational age, mean cost per surviving infant was higher for multiples than for singletons, and annual early intervention costs were higher for toddlers than for infants. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with their term counterparts, preterm infants incurred higher early intervention costs. This information along with data on birth trends will inform budget forecasting for early intervention programs. Costs that are associated with early childhood developmental services must be included when considering the long-term costs of prematurity. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17339387/Preterm_birth_associated_cost_of_early_intervention_services:_an_analysis_by_gestational_age_ L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=17339387 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -