Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

The developmental psychopathology of social anxiety in adolescents.
Depress Anxiety. 2008; 25(3):200-6.DA

Abstract

To evaluate a developmental psychopathology approach for understanding adolescent social anxiety, parent-reported predictors of social anxiety were examined in a nonclinical sample of adolescents. Structured diagnostic interviews were obtained from biological parents of 770 participants. Potential risk factors assessed included child characteristics: negative affect, shyness, separation anxiety disorder, and childhood chronic illness, as well as parent characteristics: major depression, panic disorder, and agoraphobia. Adolescent social anxiety was measured multiple times during high school. Findings indicate stability in social anxiety symptoms across time. Parent-reported, childhood negative affect, shyness, and chronic illness as well as parental panic disorder or agoraphobia were associated with adolescent social anxiety. Interactions were observed between parent-reported childhood shyness and gender and between parent-reported childhood shyness and parent-reported childhood chronic illness in the prediction of social anxiety. Parent-reported childhood shyness was a stronger predictor of adolescent social anxiety in females compared to males. The combined effect of subjects being positive for both parent-reported childhood shyness and parent-reported childhood chronic illness was greater than would be expected based on additive effects. This study provides support for a multifactorial and developmentally informed understanding of adolescent social anxiety.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-5722, USA. hayward@stanford.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17348001

Citation

Hayward, Chris, et al. "The Developmental Psychopathology of Social Anxiety in Adolescents." Depression and Anxiety, vol. 25, no. 3, 2008, pp. 200-6.
Hayward C, Wilson KA, Lagle K, et al. The developmental psychopathology of social anxiety in adolescents. Depress Anxiety. 2008;25(3):200-6.
Hayward, C., Wilson, K. A., Lagle, K., Kraemer, H. C., Killen, J. D., & Taylor, C. B. (2008). The developmental psychopathology of social anxiety in adolescents. Depression and Anxiety, 25(3), 200-6.
Hayward C, et al. The Developmental Psychopathology of Social Anxiety in Adolescents. Depress Anxiety. 2008;25(3):200-6. PubMed PMID: 17348001.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The developmental psychopathology of social anxiety in adolescents. AU - Hayward,Chris, AU - Wilson,Kimberly A, AU - Lagle,Kristy, AU - Kraemer,Helena C, AU - Killen,Joel D, AU - Taylor,C Barr, PY - 2007/3/10/pubmed PY - 2008/6/26/medline PY - 2007/3/10/entrez SP - 200 EP - 6 JF - Depression and anxiety JO - Depress Anxiety VL - 25 IS - 3 N2 - To evaluate a developmental psychopathology approach for understanding adolescent social anxiety, parent-reported predictors of social anxiety were examined in a nonclinical sample of adolescents. Structured diagnostic interviews were obtained from biological parents of 770 participants. Potential risk factors assessed included child characteristics: negative affect, shyness, separation anxiety disorder, and childhood chronic illness, as well as parent characteristics: major depression, panic disorder, and agoraphobia. Adolescent social anxiety was measured multiple times during high school. Findings indicate stability in social anxiety symptoms across time. Parent-reported, childhood negative affect, shyness, and chronic illness as well as parental panic disorder or agoraphobia were associated with adolescent social anxiety. Interactions were observed between parent-reported childhood shyness and gender and between parent-reported childhood shyness and parent-reported childhood chronic illness in the prediction of social anxiety. Parent-reported childhood shyness was a stronger predictor of adolescent social anxiety in females compared to males. The combined effect of subjects being positive for both parent-reported childhood shyness and parent-reported childhood chronic illness was greater than would be expected based on additive effects. This study provides support for a multifactorial and developmentally informed understanding of adolescent social anxiety. SN - 1091-4269 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17348001/The_developmental_psychopathology_of_social_anxiety_in_adolescents_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/da.20289 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -