Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Total cardiovascular risk profile of Taiwanese vegetarians.
Eur J Clin Nutr 2008; 62(1):138-44EJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Although the health benefits of vegetarian diets have been well documented among Western population, there are geographic differences of vegetarian diets and the health benefits of the Taiwanese vegetarian diet have not been studied extensively. In addition to conventional risk factors, homocysteine and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels have been found to predict first atherothrombotic events. We undertook this study to examine the total risk profile of Taiwanese vegetarians.

METHODS

A total of 198 healthy subjects (99 vegetarians and 99 omnivores) were recruited. Fasting blood samples were analyzed for glucose, cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), white blood cell count, hs-CRP and homocysteine.

RESULTS

There was no significant difference in age, body mass index, blood glucose, white blood cell count, triglyceride and HDL-C between the two groups. The vegetarian group had significantly more females (65.7 vs 46.5%); lower body weight (58.66+/-11.13 vs 62.88+/-12.24 kg); shorter height (159.14+/-7.88 vs 162.53 +/-8.14 cm); lower total cholesterol (184.74+/-33.23 vs 202.01+/-41.05 mg/dl); and lower LDL-C (119.63+/-31.59 vs 135.89+/-39.50 mg/dl). Hs-CRP was significantly lower (0.14+/-0.23 vs 0.23+/-0.44 mg/dl, P=0.025), whereas homocysteine was significantly higher (10.97+/-6.69 vs 8.44+/-2.50 micromol/l, P=0.001) in vegetarians than omnivores.

CONCLUSIONS

Taiwanese vegetarians have lower total cholesterol, LDL-C and hs-CRP levels, and higher homocysteine levels than omnivores. Owing to different predictive value of each risk factor, the Taiwanese vegetarians had a better cardiovascular risk profile than omnivores. Whether the Taiwanese vegetarian diet should be supplemented with vitamin B(12) to lower serum homocysteine level remains to be addressed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Section of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Buddhist Dalin Tzu Chi General Hospital, Chia-Yi, Taiwan [2] 2College of Medicine, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17356561

Citation

Chen, C-W, et al. "Total Cardiovascular Risk Profile of Taiwanese Vegetarians." European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 62, no. 1, 2008, pp. 138-44.
Chen CW, Lin YL, Lin TK, et al. Total cardiovascular risk profile of Taiwanese vegetarians. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2008;62(1):138-44.
Chen, C. W., Lin, Y. L., Lin, T. K., Lin, C. T., Chen, B. C., & Lin, C. L. (2008). Total cardiovascular risk profile of Taiwanese vegetarians. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 62(1), pp. 138-44.
Chen CW, et al. Total Cardiovascular Risk Profile of Taiwanese Vegetarians. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2008;62(1):138-44. PubMed PMID: 17356561.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Total cardiovascular risk profile of Taiwanese vegetarians. AU - Chen,C-W, AU - Lin,Y-L, AU - Lin,T-K, AU - Lin,C-T, AU - Chen,B-C, AU - Lin,C-L, Y1 - 2007/03/14/ PY - 2007/3/16/pubmed PY - 2008/3/25/medline PY - 2007/3/16/entrez SP - 138 EP - 44 JF - European journal of clinical nutrition JO - Eur J Clin Nutr VL - 62 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Although the health benefits of vegetarian diets have been well documented among Western population, there are geographic differences of vegetarian diets and the health benefits of the Taiwanese vegetarian diet have not been studied extensively. In addition to conventional risk factors, homocysteine and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels have been found to predict first atherothrombotic events. We undertook this study to examine the total risk profile of Taiwanese vegetarians. METHODS: A total of 198 healthy subjects (99 vegetarians and 99 omnivores) were recruited. Fasting blood samples were analyzed for glucose, cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), white blood cell count, hs-CRP and homocysteine. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in age, body mass index, blood glucose, white blood cell count, triglyceride and HDL-C between the two groups. The vegetarian group had significantly more females (65.7 vs 46.5%); lower body weight (58.66+/-11.13 vs 62.88+/-12.24 kg); shorter height (159.14+/-7.88 vs 162.53 +/-8.14 cm); lower total cholesterol (184.74+/-33.23 vs 202.01+/-41.05 mg/dl); and lower LDL-C (119.63+/-31.59 vs 135.89+/-39.50 mg/dl). Hs-CRP was significantly lower (0.14+/-0.23 vs 0.23+/-0.44 mg/dl, P=0.025), whereas homocysteine was significantly higher (10.97+/-6.69 vs 8.44+/-2.50 micromol/l, P=0.001) in vegetarians than omnivores. CONCLUSIONS: Taiwanese vegetarians have lower total cholesterol, LDL-C and hs-CRP levels, and higher homocysteine levels than omnivores. Owing to different predictive value of each risk factor, the Taiwanese vegetarians had a better cardiovascular risk profile than omnivores. Whether the Taiwanese vegetarian diet should be supplemented with vitamin B(12) to lower serum homocysteine level remains to be addressed. SN - 0954-3007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17356561/Total_cardiovascular_risk_profile_of_Taiwanese_vegetarians_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602689 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -