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Hunger in young children of Mexican immigrant families.
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Apr; 10(4):390-5.PH

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To measure rates of hunger and food insecurity among young US-born Latino children with Mexican immigrant parents (Latinos) compared with a non-immigrant non-Latino population (non-Latinos) in a low-income clinic population.

DESIGN, SETTING AND SUBJECTS

A repeated cross-sectional survey of 4278 caregivers of children < 3 years of age in the paediatric clinic of an urban county hospital for a 5-year period from 1998 to 2003. A total of 1310 respondents had a US-born child with at least one parent born in Mexico. They were compared with a reference group comprised of non-Latino US-born participants (n = 1805). Child hunger and household food insecurity were determined with the US Household Food Security Scale.

RESULTS

Young Latino children had much higher rates of child hunger than non-Latinos, 6.8 versus 0.5%. Latino families also had higher rates of household food insecurity than non-Latinos, 53.1 versus 15.6%. Latino children remained much more likely to be hungry (odds ratio (OR) = 13.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 5.9-28.7, P < 0.01) and in household food-insecure households (OR = 6.6, 95% CI = 5.2-8.3, P < 0.01) than non-Latinos after controlling for the following variables in multivariate analysis: child's age, sex, maternal education level, single-headed household status, family size, young maternal age (< 21 years), food stamp programme participation, TANF (Temporary Assistance to Needy Families, or 'welfare') programme participation and WIC (Women, Infants, and Children) usage, and reason for clinic visit (sick visit versus well-child).

CONCLUSION

Young children in Mexican immigrant families are at especially high risk for hunger and household food insecurity compared with non-immigrant, non-Latino patients in a low-income paediatric clinic.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN 55415, USA. kerse003@umn.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17362535

Citation

Kersey, Margaret, et al. "Hunger in Young Children of Mexican Immigrant Families." Public Health Nutrition, vol. 10, no. 4, 2007, pp. 390-5.
Kersey M, Geppert J, Cutts DB. Hunger in young children of Mexican immigrant families. Public Health Nutr. 2007;10(4):390-5.
Kersey, M., Geppert, J., & Cutts, D. B. (2007). Hunger in young children of Mexican immigrant families. Public Health Nutrition, 10(4), 390-5.
Kersey M, Geppert J, Cutts DB. Hunger in Young Children of Mexican Immigrant Families. Public Health Nutr. 2007;10(4):390-5. PubMed PMID: 17362535.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hunger in young children of Mexican immigrant families. AU - Kersey,Margaret, AU - Geppert,Joni, AU - Cutts,Diana B, PY - 2007/3/17/pubmed PY - 2007/5/30/medline PY - 2007/3/17/entrez SP - 390 EP - 5 JF - Public health nutrition JO - Public Health Nutr VL - 10 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To measure rates of hunger and food insecurity among young US-born Latino children with Mexican immigrant parents (Latinos) compared with a non-immigrant non-Latino population (non-Latinos) in a low-income clinic population. DESIGN, SETTING AND SUBJECTS: A repeated cross-sectional survey of 4278 caregivers of children < 3 years of age in the paediatric clinic of an urban county hospital for a 5-year period from 1998 to 2003. A total of 1310 respondents had a US-born child with at least one parent born in Mexico. They were compared with a reference group comprised of non-Latino US-born participants (n = 1805). Child hunger and household food insecurity were determined with the US Household Food Security Scale. RESULTS: Young Latino children had much higher rates of child hunger than non-Latinos, 6.8 versus 0.5%. Latino families also had higher rates of household food insecurity than non-Latinos, 53.1 versus 15.6%. Latino children remained much more likely to be hungry (odds ratio (OR) = 13.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 5.9-28.7, P < 0.01) and in household food-insecure households (OR = 6.6, 95% CI = 5.2-8.3, P < 0.01) than non-Latinos after controlling for the following variables in multivariate analysis: child's age, sex, maternal education level, single-headed household status, family size, young maternal age (< 21 years), food stamp programme participation, TANF (Temporary Assistance to Needy Families, or 'welfare') programme participation and WIC (Women, Infants, and Children) usage, and reason for clinic visit (sick visit versus well-child). CONCLUSION: Young children in Mexican immigrant families are at especially high risk for hunger and household food insecurity compared with non-immigrant, non-Latino patients in a low-income paediatric clinic. SN - 1368-9800 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17362535/Hunger_in_young_children_of_Mexican_immigrant_families_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S1368980007334071/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -