Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

[Shifting to subcutaneous infusion of apomorphine in advanced Parkinson's disease patients on an out-patient basis: experience and recommendations].
Neurologia. 2007 Apr; 22(3):133-7.N

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Shifting from oral medication to continuous subcutaneous infusion of apomorphine (CSIA) in Parkinson's disease (PD) may be complicated. It is unclear whether hospitalization is necessary.

OBJECTIVE

To observe efficacy and side effects in advanced PD patients shifting to CSIA managed as out-patients with hospital-based support.

MATERIAL AND METHODS

CSIA was started on 7 PD patients with uncontrollable on-off fluctuations on a waiting list for surgery. Two patients were initially admitted to hospital, all others being managed as out-patients. Awake off time was assessed with daily charts and motor function with UPDRS subscale and a scale for dyskinesias severity. Appropriate scales were applied for mood changes, neuropsychiatric complications and quality of life measures. Apomorphine dosage and oral antiparkinsonian medication were adjusted daily (mean: 6.1 days) according to motor responses. Follow-up visits were scheduled at 3 and 6 months. Patients were offered phone calls, unprogrammed visits, and 24 hours neurological care if required.

RESULTS

All patients required phone calls (mean, 4.4), but unprogrammed visits were rare (1.5). Off-time was reduced in the overall group by a 68.1 %. Co-medication with levodopa was necessary in all patients, but all other antiparkinsonian medications could be discontinued.

CONCLUSION

Shifting from oral dopaminergic therapy to CSIA is safe and effective in advanced PD managed on an out-patient basis in a hospital-based setting providing that daily in-person evaluation is available during the first week and follow-up by phone calls thereafter.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Servicio de Neurología, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid. bechi2001@hotmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
English Abstract
Journal Article

Language

spa

PubMed ID

17364250

Citation

Castaño, B, et al. "[Shifting to Subcutaneous Infusion of Apomorphine in Advanced Parkinson's Disease Patients On an Out-patient Basis: Experience and Recommendations]." Neurologia (Barcelona, Spain), vol. 22, no. 3, 2007, pp. 133-7.
Castaño B, Mateo D, Giménez-Roldán S. [Shifting to subcutaneous infusion of apomorphine in advanced Parkinson's disease patients on an out-patient basis: experience and recommendations]. Neurologia. 2007;22(3):133-7.
Castaño, B., Mateo, D., & Giménez-Roldán, S. (2007). [Shifting to subcutaneous infusion of apomorphine in advanced Parkinson's disease patients on an out-patient basis: experience and recommendations]. Neurologia (Barcelona, Spain), 22(3), 133-7.
Castaño B, Mateo D, Giménez-Roldán S. [Shifting to Subcutaneous Infusion of Apomorphine in Advanced Parkinson's Disease Patients On an Out-patient Basis: Experience and Recommendations]. Neurologia. 2007;22(3):133-7. PubMed PMID: 17364250.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Shifting to subcutaneous infusion of apomorphine in advanced Parkinson's disease patients on an out-patient basis: experience and recommendations]. AU - Castaño,B, AU - Mateo,D, AU - Giménez-Roldán,S, PY - 2007/3/17/pubmed PY - 2007/6/15/medline PY - 2007/3/17/entrez SP - 133 EP - 7 JF - Neurologia (Barcelona, Spain) JO - Neurologia VL - 22 IS - 3 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Shifting from oral medication to continuous subcutaneous infusion of apomorphine (CSIA) in Parkinson's disease (PD) may be complicated. It is unclear whether hospitalization is necessary. OBJECTIVE: To observe efficacy and side effects in advanced PD patients shifting to CSIA managed as out-patients with hospital-based support. MATERIAL AND METHODS: CSIA was started on 7 PD patients with uncontrollable on-off fluctuations on a waiting list for surgery. Two patients were initially admitted to hospital, all others being managed as out-patients. Awake off time was assessed with daily charts and motor function with UPDRS subscale and a scale for dyskinesias severity. Appropriate scales were applied for mood changes, neuropsychiatric complications and quality of life measures. Apomorphine dosage and oral antiparkinsonian medication were adjusted daily (mean: 6.1 days) according to motor responses. Follow-up visits were scheduled at 3 and 6 months. Patients were offered phone calls, unprogrammed visits, and 24 hours neurological care if required. RESULTS: All patients required phone calls (mean, 4.4), but unprogrammed visits were rare (1.5). Off-time was reduced in the overall group by a 68.1 %. Co-medication with levodopa was necessary in all patients, but all other antiparkinsonian medications could be discontinued. CONCLUSION: Shifting from oral dopaminergic therapy to CSIA is safe and effective in advanced PD managed on an out-patient basis in a hospital-based setting providing that daily in-person evaluation is available during the first week and follow-up by phone calls thereafter. SN - 0213-4853 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17364250/[Shifting_to_subcutaneous_infusion_of_apomorphine_in_advanced_Parkinson's_disease_patients_on_an_out_patient_basis:_experience_and_recommendations]_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/parkinsonsdisease.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -