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Addition of antioxidant from bamboo leaves as an effective way to reduce the formation of acrylamide in fried chicken wings.
Food Addit Contam. 2007 Mar; 24(3):242-51.FA

Abstract

The efficiency of antioxidant from bamboo leaves on the reduction of acrylamide during thermal processing and optimization of levels of addition of antioxidant from bamboo leaves applied to fried chicken wings are reported. The authors optimized the method of the addition of antioxidant from bamboo leaves to fried chicken wings and the frying processing parameters, and also compared the relationship between the content of total flavonoids in three extracts (EBL(971), EBL(972) and antioxidant from bamboo leaves) and the extent of the reduction of acrylamide. The acrylamide levels were quantified by a validated liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry detection method and the sensory evaluation was performed in a double-blind manner. The results showed that nearly 57.8 and 59.0% of acrylamide in fried chicken wings were reduced when the antioxidant from bamboo leaves addition ratios were 0.1 and 0.5% (w/w), respectively. The maximum inhibitory rate was achieved when antioxidant from bamboo leaves was chosen as the additive with a total flavonoid content of 32% compared with other two extracts and antioxidant from bamboo leaves mixed with flour was selected as the method of addition. Sensory evaluation results showed that the odour and flavour of fried chicken wings with antioxidant from bamboo leaves treatments had no significant difference compared with normal food matrixes (p > 0.05) when the antioxidant from bamboo leaves addition ratio was <0.5% (w/w). Colour acceptability in the study of sensory evaluation was in good correspondence with colour formation of fried chicken wings in each test group. These results suggest that antioxidant from bamboo leaves could significantly reduce acrylamide formation in fried chicken wings and yet still retain the original flavour and odour of the fried products. This study could be regarded as a pioneer contribution to the reduction of acrylamide in various foods by natural antioxidants.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Food Science and Nutrition, College of Biosystems Engineering and Food Science, Zhejiang University, 268 Kaixuan Road, Hangzhou 310029, Zhejiang. P. R. China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Evaluation Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17364925

Citation

Zhang, Yu, et al. "Addition of Antioxidant From Bamboo Leaves as an Effective Way to Reduce the Formation of Acrylamide in Fried Chicken Wings." Food Additives and Contaminants, vol. 24, no. 3, 2007, pp. 242-51.
Zhang Y, Xu W, Wu X, et al. Addition of antioxidant from bamboo leaves as an effective way to reduce the formation of acrylamide in fried chicken wings. Food Addit Contam. 2007;24(3):242-51.
Zhang, Y., Xu, W., Wu, X., Zhang, X., & Zhang, Y. (2007). Addition of antioxidant from bamboo leaves as an effective way to reduce the formation of acrylamide in fried chicken wings. Food Additives and Contaminants, 24(3), 242-51.
Zhang Y, et al. Addition of Antioxidant From Bamboo Leaves as an Effective Way to Reduce the Formation of Acrylamide in Fried Chicken Wings. Food Addit Contam. 2007;24(3):242-51. PubMed PMID: 17364925.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Addition of antioxidant from bamboo leaves as an effective way to reduce the formation of acrylamide in fried chicken wings. AU - Zhang,Yu, AU - Xu,Weizhong, AU - Wu,Xiaoqin, AU - Zhang,Xiaoling, AU - Zhang,Ying, PY - 2007/3/17/pubmed PY - 2007/8/8/medline PY - 2007/3/17/entrez SP - 242 EP - 51 JF - Food additives and contaminants JO - Food Addit Contam VL - 24 IS - 3 N2 - The efficiency of antioxidant from bamboo leaves on the reduction of acrylamide during thermal processing and optimization of levels of addition of antioxidant from bamboo leaves applied to fried chicken wings are reported. The authors optimized the method of the addition of antioxidant from bamboo leaves to fried chicken wings and the frying processing parameters, and also compared the relationship between the content of total flavonoids in three extracts (EBL(971), EBL(972) and antioxidant from bamboo leaves) and the extent of the reduction of acrylamide. The acrylamide levels were quantified by a validated liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry detection method and the sensory evaluation was performed in a double-blind manner. The results showed that nearly 57.8 and 59.0% of acrylamide in fried chicken wings were reduced when the antioxidant from bamboo leaves addition ratios were 0.1 and 0.5% (w/w), respectively. The maximum inhibitory rate was achieved when antioxidant from bamboo leaves was chosen as the additive with a total flavonoid content of 32% compared with other two extracts and antioxidant from bamboo leaves mixed with flour was selected as the method of addition. Sensory evaluation results showed that the odour and flavour of fried chicken wings with antioxidant from bamboo leaves treatments had no significant difference compared with normal food matrixes (p > 0.05) when the antioxidant from bamboo leaves addition ratio was <0.5% (w/w). Colour acceptability in the study of sensory evaluation was in good correspondence with colour formation of fried chicken wings in each test group. These results suggest that antioxidant from bamboo leaves could significantly reduce acrylamide formation in fried chicken wings and yet still retain the original flavour and odour of the fried products. This study could be regarded as a pioneer contribution to the reduction of acrylamide in various foods by natural antioxidants. SN - 0265-203X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17364925/Addition_of_antioxidant_from_bamboo_leaves_as_an_effective_way_to_reduce_the_formation_of_acrylamide_in_fried_chicken_wings_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/foodborneillness.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -