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Anthropometric assessment of school age children in Addis Ababa.
Ethiop Med J. 2006 Oct; 44(4):347-52.EM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Malnutrition is a major health problem in children. There are several studies of anthropometry among under-five children. However, there is scarcity of data on the nutritional status among school children and adolescents in Ethiopia as else where in developing countries.

OBJECTIVES

The objective of the study is to assess the nutritional status of school age children in Addis Ababa.

METHODS

The study design is a cross sectional anthropometric survey conducted among School age children. Anthropometric measurements were taken in 1208 children using standard measurement techniques. The NCHS reference data on height and body mass index (BMI) were used to estimate age-specific prevalence of stunting, thinness, and overweight.

RESULTS

Using the 5th percentile of the NCHS reference data, the prevalence of thinness was 28.4% for boys and 20.4% for girls; the average being 24%. The prevalence of stunting (<3rd centile) was 13.8% for boys and 6.2% for girls with an average of 9.8% for both sexes. The prevalence of overweight was 3.3%.

CONCLUSION

Thinness and stunting were shown to have low prevalence in the study group, a level which is lower than the prevalence in some developing countries. Further epidemiological study is required to better determine the true magnitude of the problem.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics & child Health, Addis Ababa University, Faculty of Medicine.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17370434

Citation

Zerfu, Mesfin, and Amha Mekasha. "Anthropometric Assessment of School Age Children in Addis Ababa." Ethiopian Medical Journal, vol. 44, no. 4, 2006, pp. 347-52.
Zerfu M, Mekasha A. Anthropometric assessment of school age children in Addis Ababa. Ethiop Med J. 2006;44(4):347-52.
Zerfu, M., & Mekasha, A. (2006). Anthropometric assessment of school age children in Addis Ababa. Ethiopian Medical Journal, 44(4), 347-52.
Zerfu M, Mekasha A. Anthropometric Assessment of School Age Children in Addis Ababa. Ethiop Med J. 2006;44(4):347-52. PubMed PMID: 17370434.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Anthropometric assessment of school age children in Addis Ababa. AU - Zerfu,Mesfin, AU - Mekasha,Amha, PY - 2007/3/21/pubmed PY - 2007/12/18/medline PY - 2007/3/21/entrez SP - 347 EP - 52 JF - Ethiopian medical journal JO - Ethiop. Med. J. VL - 44 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Malnutrition is a major health problem in children. There are several studies of anthropometry among under-five children. However, there is scarcity of data on the nutritional status among school children and adolescents in Ethiopia as else where in developing countries. OBJECTIVES: The objective of the study is to assess the nutritional status of school age children in Addis Ababa. METHODS: The study design is a cross sectional anthropometric survey conducted among School age children. Anthropometric measurements were taken in 1208 children using standard measurement techniques. The NCHS reference data on height and body mass index (BMI) were used to estimate age-specific prevalence of stunting, thinness, and overweight. RESULTS: Using the 5th percentile of the NCHS reference data, the prevalence of thinness was 28.4% for boys and 20.4% for girls; the average being 24%. The prevalence of stunting (<3rd centile) was 13.8% for boys and 6.2% for girls with an average of 9.8% for both sexes. The prevalence of overweight was 3.3%. CONCLUSION: Thinness and stunting were shown to have low prevalence in the study group, a level which is lower than the prevalence in some developing countries. Further epidemiological study is required to better determine the true magnitude of the problem. SN - 0014-1755 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17370434/Anthropometric_assessment_of_school_age_children_in_Addis_Ababa_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/nutrition.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -