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An epidemiological study of animal bites in India: results of a WHO sponsored national multi-centric rabies survey.
J Commun Dis. 2006 Mar; 38(1):32-9.JC

Abstract

This was a WHO sponsored national multi-centric rabies survey and one of its objectives was to find out the incidence of animal bites, anti-rabies treatment practices, Pet dog population and their care. Twenty-one medical colleges chosen with geoscatter representation conducted the survey during February-August, 2003. The survey was conducted in 18 states, covering a population of 52,731 chosen randomly from 8500 households. The annual incidence of animal bites was high, 1.7% and it was more in rural areas (1.8%), children (2.6%) and poor/low income group (75%). The main biting animal was dog (91.5%), mostly stray (63%), followed by cat (4.7%). A high proportion of bite victims did not wash their wounds with soap and water (39.5%), preferred Government hospitals (59.9%) and nerve tissue vaccine (46.9%). The use of rabies immunoglobulin was low (2.1%). A single animal bite episode led to a loss of 2.2 man-days and the cost of medicines including anti-rabies vaccine was Rs.252 (US$6). The recourse to indigenous treatment (45.3%) and local application to wound (36.8%/) was quite prevalent. About 17% of households reported having a pet/domesticated dog and the pet dog: man ratio was 1: 36. Pet dog care/management practices were not satisfactory with a low veterinary consultation (35.5%) and vaccination (32.9%). The situation was slightly better in urban areas. The people also reported the presence (83%) and menace (22.8%) of stray dogs. It is recommended to initiate appropriate community awareness and dog vaccination campaigns and effective stray dog control measures.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Association for Prevention and Control of Rabies in India (APCRI).No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17370688

Citation

Sudarshan, M K., et al. "An Epidemiological Study of Animal Bites in India: Results of a WHO Sponsored National Multi-centric Rabies Survey." The Journal of Communicable Diseases, vol. 38, no. 1, 2006, pp. 32-9.
Sudarshan MK, Mahendra BJ, Madhusudana SN, et al. An epidemiological study of animal bites in India: results of a WHO sponsored national multi-centric rabies survey. J Commun Dis. 2006;38(1):32-9.
Sudarshan, M. K., Mahendra, B. J., Madhusudana, S. N., Ashwoath Narayana, D. H., Rahman, A., Rao, N. S., X-Meslin, F., Lobo, D., Ravikumar, K., & Gangaboraiah, . (2006). An epidemiological study of animal bites in India: results of a WHO sponsored national multi-centric rabies survey. The Journal of Communicable Diseases, 38(1), 32-9.
Sudarshan MK, et al. An Epidemiological Study of Animal Bites in India: Results of a WHO Sponsored National Multi-centric Rabies Survey. J Commun Dis. 2006;38(1):32-9. PubMed PMID: 17370688.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - An epidemiological study of animal bites in India: results of a WHO sponsored national multi-centric rabies survey. AU - Sudarshan,M K, AU - Mahendra,B J, AU - Madhusudana,S N, AU - Ashwoath Narayana,D H, AU - Rahman,Abdul, AU - Rao,N S N, AU - X-Meslin,F, AU - Lobo,Derek, AU - Ravikumar,K, AU - Gangaboraiah,, PY - 2007/3/21/pubmed PY - 2007/4/26/medline PY - 2007/3/21/entrez SP - 32 EP - 9 JF - The Journal of communicable diseases JO - J Commun Dis VL - 38 IS - 1 N2 - This was a WHO sponsored national multi-centric rabies survey and one of its objectives was to find out the incidence of animal bites, anti-rabies treatment practices, Pet dog population and their care. Twenty-one medical colleges chosen with geoscatter representation conducted the survey during February-August, 2003. The survey was conducted in 18 states, covering a population of 52,731 chosen randomly from 8500 households. The annual incidence of animal bites was high, 1.7% and it was more in rural areas (1.8%), children (2.6%) and poor/low income group (75%). The main biting animal was dog (91.5%), mostly stray (63%), followed by cat (4.7%). A high proportion of bite victims did not wash their wounds with soap and water (39.5%), preferred Government hospitals (59.9%) and nerve tissue vaccine (46.9%). The use of rabies immunoglobulin was low (2.1%). A single animal bite episode led to a loss of 2.2 man-days and the cost of medicines including anti-rabies vaccine was Rs.252 (US$6). The recourse to indigenous treatment (45.3%) and local application to wound (36.8%/) was quite prevalent. About 17% of households reported having a pet/domesticated dog and the pet dog: man ratio was 1: 36. Pet dog care/management practices were not satisfactory with a low veterinary consultation (35.5%) and vaccination (32.9%). The situation was slightly better in urban areas. The people also reported the presence (83%) and menace (22.8%) of stray dogs. It is recommended to initiate appropriate community awareness and dog vaccination campaigns and effective stray dog control measures. SN - 0019-5138 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17370688/An_epidemiological_study_of_animal_bites_in_India:_results_of_a_WHO_sponsored_national_multi_centric_rabies_survey_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -