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Oral administration of Ginkgo biloba extract, EGb-761 inhibits thermal hyperalgesia in rodent models of inflammatory and post-surgical pain.
Br J Pharmacol. 2007 May; 151(2):285-91.BJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE

Studies in vitro suggest that the standardised extract of Ginkgo biloba, EGb-761 has anti-inflammatory properties and modulatory effects on key pain-related molecules. This study investigated the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of EGb-761 on carrageenan-induced inflammatory and hindpaw incisional pain.

EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH

Adult male Wistar rats (n=6-10/group; 250-420 g) were injected intradermally with carrageenan into the left hindpaw or anaesthetised with isoflurane (2%) and a longitudinal 1 cm incision was made through the skin, fascia and plantaris muscle of the hindpaw. EGb-761 (3, 10, 30, 100 or 300 mg kg(-1)), diclofenac (5 mg kg(-1)) or drug-vehicle was administered 3 h post-carrageenan/post-surgery. Hindpaw withdrawal latency (in seconds) to thermal stimulation, response threshold (in grams) to mechanical stimulation and paw volume were measured.

KEY RESULTS

Carrageenan induced significant mechanical allodynia, thermal hyperalgesia and paw oedema at 6 h post-carrageenan, while paw incision surgery induced significant mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia at 6 and 24 h post-surgery. Administration of EGb-761 dose-dependently inhibited thermal hyperalgesia and was equally effective as diclofenac (5 mg kg(-1)) in both the carrageenan and hindpaw incision model. EGb-761 had no effect on carrageenan- or incision-induced mechanical allodynia or paw oedema. Diclofenac significantly reduced mechanical allodynia in both models and carrageenan-induced paw oedema.

CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS

EGb-761 dose-dependently alleviates acute inflammatory and surgically induced thermal hyperalgesia and is comparable to diclofenac, a commonly prescribed non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. This indicates that EGb-761 has analgesic potential in acute inflammatory pain.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17375081

Citation

Biddlestone, L, et al. "Oral Administration of Ginkgo Biloba Extract, EGb-761 Inhibits Thermal Hyperalgesia in Rodent Models of Inflammatory and Post-surgical Pain." British Journal of Pharmacology, vol. 151, no. 2, 2007, pp. 285-91.
Biddlestone L, Corbett AD, Dolan S. Oral administration of Ginkgo biloba extract, EGb-761 inhibits thermal hyperalgesia in rodent models of inflammatory and post-surgical pain. Br J Pharmacol. 2007;151(2):285-91.
Biddlestone, L., Corbett, A. D., & Dolan, S. (2007). Oral administration of Ginkgo biloba extract, EGb-761 inhibits thermal hyperalgesia in rodent models of inflammatory and post-surgical pain. British Journal of Pharmacology, 151(2), 285-91.
Biddlestone L, Corbett AD, Dolan S. Oral Administration of Ginkgo Biloba Extract, EGb-761 Inhibits Thermal Hyperalgesia in Rodent Models of Inflammatory and Post-surgical Pain. Br J Pharmacol. 2007;151(2):285-91. PubMed PMID: 17375081.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Oral administration of Ginkgo biloba extract, EGb-761 inhibits thermal hyperalgesia in rodent models of inflammatory and post-surgical pain. AU - Biddlestone,L, AU - Corbett,A D, AU - Dolan,S, Y1 - 2007/03/20/ PY - 2007/3/22/pubmed PY - 2007/8/8/medline PY - 2007/3/22/entrez SP - 285 EP - 91 JF - British journal of pharmacology JO - Br J Pharmacol VL - 151 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Studies in vitro suggest that the standardised extract of Ginkgo biloba, EGb-761 has anti-inflammatory properties and modulatory effects on key pain-related molecules. This study investigated the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of EGb-761 on carrageenan-induced inflammatory and hindpaw incisional pain. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH: Adult male Wistar rats (n=6-10/group; 250-420 g) were injected intradermally with carrageenan into the left hindpaw or anaesthetised with isoflurane (2%) and a longitudinal 1 cm incision was made through the skin, fascia and plantaris muscle of the hindpaw. EGb-761 (3, 10, 30, 100 or 300 mg kg(-1)), diclofenac (5 mg kg(-1)) or drug-vehicle was administered 3 h post-carrageenan/post-surgery. Hindpaw withdrawal latency (in seconds) to thermal stimulation, response threshold (in grams) to mechanical stimulation and paw volume were measured. KEY RESULTS: Carrageenan induced significant mechanical allodynia, thermal hyperalgesia and paw oedema at 6 h post-carrageenan, while paw incision surgery induced significant mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia at 6 and 24 h post-surgery. Administration of EGb-761 dose-dependently inhibited thermal hyperalgesia and was equally effective as diclofenac (5 mg kg(-1)) in both the carrageenan and hindpaw incision model. EGb-761 had no effect on carrageenan- or incision-induced mechanical allodynia or paw oedema. Diclofenac significantly reduced mechanical allodynia in both models and carrageenan-induced paw oedema. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: EGb-761 dose-dependently alleviates acute inflammatory and surgically induced thermal hyperalgesia and is comparable to diclofenac, a commonly prescribed non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. This indicates that EGb-761 has analgesic potential in acute inflammatory pain. SN - 0007-1188 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17375081/Oral_administration_of_Ginkgo_biloba_extract_EGb_761_inhibits_thermal_hyperalgesia_in_rodent_models_of_inflammatory_and_post_surgical_pain_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.bjp.0707220 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -