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Minimizing random error in dietary intakes assessed by 24-h recall, in overweight and obese adults.
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2008 Apr; 62(4):537-43.EJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the minimum number of days of dietary intake interviews required to reduce the effects of random error (day-to-day variability in dietary intake) when using the multiple-pass, multiple-day, 24-h recall method.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional study.

SETTING

University research department.

SUBJECTS

A total of 50 healthy non-smoking overweight and obese (body mass index=26-40 kg/m2) adult men and women aged 39-45 years completed the study. Participants were randomly selected from volunteers for a larger unrelated study.

INTERVENTIONS

Each participant completed 10, multiple-pass, 24-h recall interviews on randomly chosen days over 4 weeks. The minimum number of record days was determined for each macronutrient (carbohydrate, fat, protein) and energy, for each gender, to obtain a 'true' (unobservable) representative intake from reported (observed) dietary intakes.

RESULTS

The greatest number of days required to obtain a 'true' representative intake was 8 days. Carbohydrate intakes required the greatest number of days of dietary record among males (7 days), whereas protein required the greatest number of days among females (8 days) in this cohort. Sunday was the day of the week that showed greatest variability in macronutrient intakes. Protein (P<0.05) and fat (P<0.001) intakes were significantly more variable than carbohydrate on Sundays compared with weekdays, for both men and women.

CONCLUSION

A logistically achievable 8 days of dietary intake interviews was sufficient to minimize the effect of random error when using the multiple-pass, 24-h recall dietary intake method. Sunday should be included among the dietary interview days to ensure a 'true' representation of macronutrient intakes. This method can be confidently applied to small cohort studies in which dietary intakes from different groups are to be compared or to investigations of associations between nutrient intakes and disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia. kathryn.jackson@unisa.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17375109

Citation

Jackson, K A., et al. "Minimizing Random Error in Dietary Intakes Assessed By 24-h Recall, in Overweight and Obese Adults." European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 62, no. 4, 2008, pp. 537-43.
Jackson KA, Byrne NM, Magarey AM, et al. Minimizing random error in dietary intakes assessed by 24-h recall, in overweight and obese adults. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2008;62(4):537-43.
Jackson, K. A., Byrne, N. M., Magarey, A. M., & Hills, A. P. (2008). Minimizing random error in dietary intakes assessed by 24-h recall, in overweight and obese adults. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 62(4), 537-43.
Jackson KA, et al. Minimizing Random Error in Dietary Intakes Assessed By 24-h Recall, in Overweight and Obese Adults. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2008;62(4):537-43. PubMed PMID: 17375109.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Minimizing random error in dietary intakes assessed by 24-h recall, in overweight and obese adults. AU - Jackson,K A, AU - Byrne,N M, AU - Magarey,A M, AU - Hills,A P, Y1 - 2007/03/21/ PY - 2007/3/22/pubmed PY - 2008/7/29/medline PY - 2007/3/22/entrez SP - 537 EP - 43 JF - European journal of clinical nutrition JO - Eur J Clin Nutr VL - 62 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine the minimum number of days of dietary intake interviews required to reduce the effects of random error (day-to-day variability in dietary intake) when using the multiple-pass, multiple-day, 24-h recall method. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: University research department. SUBJECTS: A total of 50 healthy non-smoking overweight and obese (body mass index=26-40 kg/m2) adult men and women aged 39-45 years completed the study. Participants were randomly selected from volunteers for a larger unrelated study. INTERVENTIONS: Each participant completed 10, multiple-pass, 24-h recall interviews on randomly chosen days over 4 weeks. The minimum number of record days was determined for each macronutrient (carbohydrate, fat, protein) and energy, for each gender, to obtain a 'true' (unobservable) representative intake from reported (observed) dietary intakes. RESULTS: The greatest number of days required to obtain a 'true' representative intake was 8 days. Carbohydrate intakes required the greatest number of days of dietary record among males (7 days), whereas protein required the greatest number of days among females (8 days) in this cohort. Sunday was the day of the week that showed greatest variability in macronutrient intakes. Protein (P<0.05) and fat (P<0.001) intakes were significantly more variable than carbohydrate on Sundays compared with weekdays, for both men and women. CONCLUSION: A logistically achievable 8 days of dietary intake interviews was sufficient to minimize the effect of random error when using the multiple-pass, 24-h recall dietary intake method. Sunday should be included among the dietary interview days to ensure a 'true' representation of macronutrient intakes. This method can be confidently applied to small cohort studies in which dietary intakes from different groups are to be compared or to investigations of associations between nutrient intakes and disease. SN - 0954-3007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17375109/Minimizing_random_error_in_dietary_intakes_assessed_by_24_h_recall_in_overweight_and_obese_adults_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602740 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -