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Relating effortful control, executive function, and false belief understanding to emerging math and literacy ability in kindergarten.
Child Dev 2007 Mar-Apr; 78(2):647-63CD

Abstract

This study examined the role of self-regulation in emerging academic ability in one hundred and forty-one 3- to 5-year-old children from low-income homes. Measures of effortful control, false belief understanding, and the inhibitory control and attention-shifting aspects of executive function in preschool were related to measures of math and literacy ability in kindergarten. Results indicated that the various aspects of child self-regulation accounted for unique variance in the academic outcomes independent of general intelligence and that the inhibitory control aspect of executive function was a prominent correlate of both early math and reading ability. Findings suggest that curricula designed to improve self-regulation skills as well as enhance early academic abilities may be most effective in helping children succeed in school.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Human Development and Family Studies, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park 16802-6504, USA. cbb11@psu.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17381795

Citation

Blair, Clancy, and Rachel Peters Razza. "Relating Effortful Control, Executive Function, and False Belief Understanding to Emerging Math and Literacy Ability in Kindergarten." Child Development, vol. 78, no. 2, 2007, pp. 647-63.
Blair C, Razza RP. Relating effortful control, executive function, and false belief understanding to emerging math and literacy ability in kindergarten. Child Dev. 2007;78(2):647-63.
Blair, C., & Razza, R. P. (2007). Relating effortful control, executive function, and false belief understanding to emerging math and literacy ability in kindergarten. Child Development, 78(2), pp. 647-63.
Blair C, Razza RP. Relating Effortful Control, Executive Function, and False Belief Understanding to Emerging Math and Literacy Ability in Kindergarten. Child Dev. 2007;78(2):647-63. PubMed PMID: 17381795.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Relating effortful control, executive function, and false belief understanding to emerging math and literacy ability in kindergarten. AU - Blair,Clancy, AU - Razza,Rachel Peters, PY - 2007/3/27/pubmed PY - 2007/7/7/medline PY - 2007/3/27/entrez SP - 647 EP - 63 JF - Child development JO - Child Dev VL - 78 IS - 2 N2 - This study examined the role of self-regulation in emerging academic ability in one hundred and forty-one 3- to 5-year-old children from low-income homes. Measures of effortful control, false belief understanding, and the inhibitory control and attention-shifting aspects of executive function in preschool were related to measures of math and literacy ability in kindergarten. Results indicated that the various aspects of child self-regulation accounted for unique variance in the academic outcomes independent of general intelligence and that the inhibitory control aspect of executive function was a prominent correlate of both early math and reading ability. Findings suggest that curricula designed to improve self-regulation skills as well as enhance early academic abilities may be most effective in helping children succeed in school. SN - 0009-3920 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17381795/Relating_effortful_control_executive_function_and_false_belief_understanding_to_emerging_math_and_literacy_ability_in_kindergarten_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2007.01019.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -