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Mild riboflavin deficiency is highly prevalent in school-age children but does not increase risk for anaemia in Côte d'Ivoire.
Br J Nutr. 2007 May; 97(5):970-6.BJ

Abstract

There are few data on the prevalence of riboflavin deficiency in sub-Saharan Africa, and it remains unclear whether riboflavin status influences the risk for anaemia. The aims of this study were to: (1) measure the prevalence of riboflavin deficiency in children in south-central Côte d'Ivoire; (2) estimate the riboflavin content of the local diet; and (3) determine if riboflavin deficiency predicts anaemia and/or iron deficiency. In 5- to 15-year-old children (n 281), height, weight, haemoglobin (Hb), whole blood zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP), erythrocyte glutathione reductase activity coefficient (EGRAC), serum retinol, C-reactive protein (CRP) and prevalence of Plasmodium spp. (asymptomatic malaria) and Schistosoma haematobium (bilharziosis) infections were measured. Three-day weighed food records were kept in twenty-four households. Prevalence of anaemia in the sample was 52%; 59% were iron-deficient based on an elevated ZPP concentration, and 36% suffered from iron deficiency anaemia. Plasmodium parasitaemia was found in 49% of the children. Nineteen percent of the children were infected with S. haematobium. Median riboflavin intake in 5- to 15-year-old children from the food records was 0.42 mg/d, approximately 47% of the estimated average requirement for this age group. Prevalence of riboflavin deficiency was 65%, as defined by an EGRAC value > 1.2. Age, elevated CRP and iron deficiency were significant predictors of Hb. Riboflavin-deficient children free of malaria were more likely to be iron deficient (odds ratio; 3.07; 95% CI 1.12, 8.41). In conclusion, nearly two-thirds of school-age children in south-central Côte d'Ivoire are mildly riboflavin deficient. Riboflavin deficiency did not predict Hb and/or anaemia, but did predict iron deficiency among children free of malaria.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Human Nutrition Laboratory, Institute of Food Science and Nutrition, ETH Zurich, Schmelzbergstrasse 7, 8092 Ziirich, Switzerland. fabian.rohner@ilw.agrl.ethz.chNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17381972

Citation

Rohner, Fabian, et al. "Mild Riboflavin Deficiency Is Highly Prevalent in School-age Children but Does Not Increase Risk for Anaemia in Côte D'Ivoire." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 97, no. 5, 2007, pp. 970-6.
Rohner F, Zimmermann MB, Wegmueller R, et al. Mild riboflavin deficiency is highly prevalent in school-age children but does not increase risk for anaemia in Côte d'Ivoire. Br J Nutr. 2007;97(5):970-6.
Rohner, F., Zimmermann, M. B., Wegmueller, R., Tschannen, A. B., & Hurrell, R. F. (2007). Mild riboflavin deficiency is highly prevalent in school-age children but does not increase risk for anaemia in Côte d'Ivoire. The British Journal of Nutrition, 97(5), 970-6.
Rohner F, et al. Mild Riboflavin Deficiency Is Highly Prevalent in School-age Children but Does Not Increase Risk for Anaemia in Côte D'Ivoire. Br J Nutr. 2007;97(5):970-6. PubMed PMID: 17381972.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Mild riboflavin deficiency is highly prevalent in school-age children but does not increase risk for anaemia in Côte d'Ivoire. AU - Rohner,Fabian, AU - Zimmermann,Michael B, AU - Wegmueller,Rita, AU - Tschannen,Andreas B, AU - Hurrell,Richard F, PY - 2007/3/27/pubmed PY - 2007/12/6/medline PY - 2007/3/27/entrez SP - 970 EP - 6 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br J Nutr VL - 97 IS - 5 N2 - There are few data on the prevalence of riboflavin deficiency in sub-Saharan Africa, and it remains unclear whether riboflavin status influences the risk for anaemia. The aims of this study were to: (1) measure the prevalence of riboflavin deficiency in children in south-central Côte d'Ivoire; (2) estimate the riboflavin content of the local diet; and (3) determine if riboflavin deficiency predicts anaemia and/or iron deficiency. In 5- to 15-year-old children (n 281), height, weight, haemoglobin (Hb), whole blood zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP), erythrocyte glutathione reductase activity coefficient (EGRAC), serum retinol, C-reactive protein (CRP) and prevalence of Plasmodium spp. (asymptomatic malaria) and Schistosoma haematobium (bilharziosis) infections were measured. Three-day weighed food records were kept in twenty-four households. Prevalence of anaemia in the sample was 52%; 59% were iron-deficient based on an elevated ZPP concentration, and 36% suffered from iron deficiency anaemia. Plasmodium parasitaemia was found in 49% of the children. Nineteen percent of the children were infected with S. haematobium. Median riboflavin intake in 5- to 15-year-old children from the food records was 0.42 mg/d, approximately 47% of the estimated average requirement for this age group. Prevalence of riboflavin deficiency was 65%, as defined by an EGRAC value > 1.2. Age, elevated CRP and iron deficiency were significant predictors of Hb. Riboflavin-deficient children free of malaria were more likely to be iron deficient (odds ratio; 3.07; 95% CI 1.12, 8.41). In conclusion, nearly two-thirds of school-age children in south-central Côte d'Ivoire are mildly riboflavin deficient. Riboflavin deficiency did not predict Hb and/or anaemia, but did predict iron deficiency among children free of malaria. SN - 0007-1145 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17381972/Mild_riboflavin_deficiency_is_highly_prevalent_in_school_age_children_but_does_not_increase_risk_for_anaemia_in_Côte_d'Ivoire_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114507665180/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -