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Asymptomatic schistosomiasis in a young Sudanese refugee.
Aust Fam Physician. 2007 Apr; 36(4):249-51.AF

Abstract

In 2004-2005, approximately 13,000 refugees settled in Australia, 70% of them from Africa. Schistosomiasis is one of the many illnesses endemic in Africa and approximately 40% of refugees have been found to be infected by this parasite. It has the potential to cause serious morbidity and mortality in those who are infected and after malaria is the second most prevalent tropical disease worldwide. Australia is not known to have an appropriate snail vector and so schistosomiasis is unlikely to be a public health problem. This article presents a case that demonstrates one of the sequelae of schistosomiasis - pipe stem cirrhosis - with associated splenomegaly and oesophageal varices.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Health in Human Diversity Unit, Discipline of General Practice, University of Adelaide, Australia. jill.benson@adelaide.edu.au

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17392939

Citation

Benson, Jill. "Asymptomatic Schistosomiasis in a Young Sudanese Refugee." Australian Family Physician, vol. 36, no. 4, 2007, pp. 249-51.
Benson J. Asymptomatic schistosomiasis in a young Sudanese refugee. Aust Fam Physician. 2007;36(4):249-51.
Benson, J. (2007). Asymptomatic schistosomiasis in a young Sudanese refugee. Australian Family Physician, 36(4), 249-51.
Benson J. Asymptomatic Schistosomiasis in a Young Sudanese Refugee. Aust Fam Physician. 2007;36(4):249-51. PubMed PMID: 17392939.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Asymptomatic schistosomiasis in a young Sudanese refugee. A1 - Benson,Jill, PY - 2007/3/30/pubmed PY - 2007/5/11/medline PY - 2007/3/30/entrez SP - 249 EP - 51 JF - Australian family physician JO - Aust Fam Physician VL - 36 IS - 4 N2 - In 2004-2005, approximately 13,000 refugees settled in Australia, 70% of them from Africa. Schistosomiasis is one of the many illnesses endemic in Africa and approximately 40% of refugees have been found to be infected by this parasite. It has the potential to cause serious morbidity and mortality in those who are infected and after malaria is the second most prevalent tropical disease worldwide. Australia is not known to have an appropriate snail vector and so schistosomiasis is unlikely to be a public health problem. This article presents a case that demonstrates one of the sequelae of schistosomiasis - pipe stem cirrhosis - with associated splenomegaly and oesophageal varices. SN - 0300-8495 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17392939/Asymptomatic_schistosomiasis_in_a_young_Sudanese_refugee_ L2 - http://www.racgp.org.au/afp/200704/15745 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -