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Work-related repetitive strain injury and leisure-time physical activity.
Arthritis Rheum. 2007 Apr 15; 57(3):495-500.AR

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate the relationship between leisure-time physical activity and work-related repetitive strain injury (RSI), adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics and work-related physical and stress factors.

METHODS

The data source was the 2003 Canadian Community Health Survey, a national cross-sectional survey of 134,072 respondents. The analysis was limited to a sample of the survey population reporting full-time work during the past 12 months (n = 58,622). The outcome of interest was work-related RSI of the upper body. Multiple logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between the outcome and leisure-time physical activity level, adjusted for sociodemographic, health, and occupational characteristics. The potential effect of leisure-time physical activity with a high upper-body load was investigated in a secondary analysis.

RESULTS

The prevalence of upper-body work-related RSI was 5.9% in the Canadian population in 2003. An active lifestyle during leisure time was associated with a lower prevalence of work-related upper-body RSI (odds ratio 0.84, 99% confidence interval 0.75-0.95), after adjustment for work physical demands and other covariates. Female sex, obesity, smoking, age, work-related stress, and work physical demands were associated with RSI. In the secondary analysis, we did not find that participating in leisure-time activities with a high upper-body load was a risk factor for RSI.

CONCLUSION

Our study results indicate that being physically active during leisure time is associated with a decreased risk of upper-body occupational RSI, adding another potential health benefit to participation in leisure-time physical activity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

St. Paul's Hospital Orthopaedic Medicine Clinic, the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. cratzlaf@interchange.ubc.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17394178

Citation

Ratzlaff, C R., et al. "Work-related Repetitive Strain Injury and Leisure-time Physical Activity." Arthritis and Rheumatism, vol. 57, no. 3, 2007, pp. 495-500.
Ratzlaff CR, Gillies JH, Koehoorn MW. Work-related repetitive strain injury and leisure-time physical activity. Arthritis Rheum. 2007;57(3):495-500.
Ratzlaff, C. R., Gillies, J. H., & Koehoorn, M. W. (2007). Work-related repetitive strain injury and leisure-time physical activity. Arthritis and Rheumatism, 57(3), 495-500.
Ratzlaff CR, Gillies JH, Koehoorn MW. Work-related Repetitive Strain Injury and Leisure-time Physical Activity. Arthritis Rheum. 2007 Apr 15;57(3):495-500. PubMed PMID: 17394178.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Work-related repetitive strain injury and leisure-time physical activity. AU - Ratzlaff,C R, AU - Gillies,J H, AU - Koehoorn,M W, PY - 2007/3/31/pubmed PY - 2007/5/2/medline PY - 2007/3/31/entrez SP - 495 EP - 500 JF - Arthritis and rheumatism JO - Arthritis Rheum. VL - 57 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between leisure-time physical activity and work-related repetitive strain injury (RSI), adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics and work-related physical and stress factors. METHODS: The data source was the 2003 Canadian Community Health Survey, a national cross-sectional survey of 134,072 respondents. The analysis was limited to a sample of the survey population reporting full-time work during the past 12 months (n = 58,622). The outcome of interest was work-related RSI of the upper body. Multiple logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between the outcome and leisure-time physical activity level, adjusted for sociodemographic, health, and occupational characteristics. The potential effect of leisure-time physical activity with a high upper-body load was investigated in a secondary analysis. RESULTS: The prevalence of upper-body work-related RSI was 5.9% in the Canadian population in 2003. An active lifestyle during leisure time was associated with a lower prevalence of work-related upper-body RSI (odds ratio 0.84, 99% confidence interval 0.75-0.95), after adjustment for work physical demands and other covariates. Female sex, obesity, smoking, age, work-related stress, and work physical demands were associated with RSI. In the secondary analysis, we did not find that participating in leisure-time activities with a high upper-body load was a risk factor for RSI. CONCLUSION: Our study results indicate that being physically active during leisure time is associated with a decreased risk of upper-body occupational RSI, adding another potential health benefit to participation in leisure-time physical activity. SN - 0004-3591 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17394178/Work_related_repetitive_strain_injury_and_leisure_time_physical_activity_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/art.22610 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -