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Ambient UVB and melanoma risk in the United States: a case-control analysis.
Ann Epidemiol 2007; 17(6):447-53AE

Abstract

PURPOSE

Exposure to ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation is a well-established risk factor for human cutaneous malignant melanoma. Intermittent and cumulative exposures from UVB have been estimated most often by interview questionnaire. This study assessed cumulative UVB using a ground-based measurement instrument to estimate the association between UVB and melanoma.

METHODS

Population-based, incident cases of melanoma (n = 380) and frequency-matched controls (n = 364) residing in Connecticut at diagnosis were interviewed between 1987 and 1989 about recreational and vacation activities, sun-protection practices, occupation, and other factors. Using a residential history, regression estimates of lifetime UVB were derived from ambient measures of UVB, adjusted for intermittent exposure.

RESULTS

Cases and controls received 29% of lifetime mean UVB in the first 15 years of life. Number of days per year in recreational activity during childhood and late adulthood were associated with increased melanoma risk. When estimating lifetime UVB adjusted for intermittent exposure, melanoma risk peaked at a 5.7-fold increased risk in the ninth decile.

CONCLUSION

Sporadic and chronic sun exposure play a role in melanoma etiology. Skin-protection practices should be encouraged across levels of sun intensity, not only in childhood but throughout adulthood.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology and Public Health Biology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA; USA. SLea@rti.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17395487

Citation

Lea, C Suzanne, et al. "Ambient UVB and Melanoma Risk in the United States: a Case-control Analysis." Annals of Epidemiology, vol. 17, no. 6, 2007, pp. 447-53.
Lea CS, Scotto JA, Buffler PA, et al. Ambient UVB and melanoma risk in the United States: a case-control analysis. Ann Epidemiol. 2007;17(6):447-53.
Lea, C. S., Scotto, J. A., Buffler, P. A., Fine, J., Barnhill, R. L., & Berwick, M. (2007). Ambient UVB and melanoma risk in the United States: a case-control analysis. Annals of Epidemiology, 17(6), pp. 447-53.
Lea CS, et al. Ambient UVB and Melanoma Risk in the United States: a Case-control Analysis. Ann Epidemiol. 2007;17(6):447-53. PubMed PMID: 17395487.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ambient UVB and melanoma risk in the United States: a case-control analysis. AU - Lea,C Suzanne, AU - Scotto,Joseph A, AU - Buffler,Patricia A, AU - Fine,Judith, AU - Barnhill,Raymond L, AU - Berwick,Marianne, Y1 - 2007/03/28/ PY - 2006/08/09/received PY - 2006/12/29/revised PY - 2007/01/08/accepted PY - 2007/3/31/pubmed PY - 2007/8/2/medline PY - 2007/3/31/entrez SP - 447 EP - 53 JF - Annals of epidemiology JO - Ann Epidemiol VL - 17 IS - 6 N2 - PURPOSE: Exposure to ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation is a well-established risk factor for human cutaneous malignant melanoma. Intermittent and cumulative exposures from UVB have been estimated most often by interview questionnaire. This study assessed cumulative UVB using a ground-based measurement instrument to estimate the association between UVB and melanoma. METHODS: Population-based, incident cases of melanoma (n = 380) and frequency-matched controls (n = 364) residing in Connecticut at diagnosis were interviewed between 1987 and 1989 about recreational and vacation activities, sun-protection practices, occupation, and other factors. Using a residential history, regression estimates of lifetime UVB were derived from ambient measures of UVB, adjusted for intermittent exposure. RESULTS: Cases and controls received 29% of lifetime mean UVB in the first 15 years of life. Number of days per year in recreational activity during childhood and late adulthood were associated with increased melanoma risk. When estimating lifetime UVB adjusted for intermittent exposure, melanoma risk peaked at a 5.7-fold increased risk in the ninth decile. CONCLUSION: Sporadic and chronic sun exposure play a role in melanoma etiology. Skin-protection practices should be encouraged across levels of sun intensity, not only in childhood but throughout adulthood. SN - 1047-2797 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17395487/Ambient_UVB_and_melanoma_risk_in_the_United_States:_a_case_control_analysis_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1047-2797(07)00039-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -