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Anthropometrics and prostate cancer risk.
Am J Epidemiol. 2007 Jun 01; 165(11):1271-9.AJ

Abstract

Studies on obesity and prostate cancer risk are inconsistent, perhaps because of differential effects on aggressive and nonaggressive cancers. Participants included 34,754 men residing in Washington State (aged 50-76 years at baseline) in a prospective cohort study who were recruited between 2000 and 2002; 383 developed aggressive (regional/distant stage or Gleason sum 7-10) and 437 developed nonaggressive disease through December 2004. Compared with normal-weight men (body mass index (kg/m(2)) <25), obese men (> or = 30 kg/m(2)) had a reduced risk of nonaggressive disease (hazard ratio = 0.69, 95% confidence interval: 0.52, 0.93; p for trend = 0.01). Overweight men (25-29.9 kg/m(2)) had an increased risk of aggressive disease (hazard ratio = 1.4, 95% confidence interval: 1.1, 1.8), but there was no increased risk for obese men (p for trend = 0.69). Body mass index of >25 at age 18 years was associated with increased risk of aggressive prostate cancer; obesity at ages 30 and 45, but not 18, years was associated with reduced risk of nonaggressive prostate cancer. Height (fourth vs. first quartile) was associated with an increased risk of total prostate cancer (hazard ratio = 1.3, 95% confidence interval: 1.1, 1.6), which did not differ by aggressiveness. There were no associations of prostate cancer with age at which maximum height was reached. Results from this study demonstrate the complexity of prostate cancer epidemiology and the importance of examining risk factors by tumor characteristics.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA 98101, USA. alittman@fhcrc.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17395597

Citation

Littman, Alyson J., et al. "Anthropometrics and Prostate Cancer Risk." American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 165, no. 11, 2007, pp. 1271-9.
Littman AJ, White E, Kristal AR. Anthropometrics and prostate cancer risk. Am J Epidemiol. 2007;165(11):1271-9.
Littman, A. J., White, E., & Kristal, A. R. (2007). Anthropometrics and prostate cancer risk. American Journal of Epidemiology, 165(11), 1271-9.
Littman AJ, White E, Kristal AR. Anthropometrics and Prostate Cancer Risk. Am J Epidemiol. 2007 Jun 1;165(11):1271-9. PubMed PMID: 17395597.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Anthropometrics and prostate cancer risk. AU - Littman,Alyson J, AU - White,Emily, AU - Kristal,Alan R, Y1 - 2007/03/28/ PY - 2007/3/31/pubmed PY - 2007/7/14/medline PY - 2007/3/31/entrez SP - 1271 EP - 9 JF - American journal of epidemiology JO - Am J Epidemiol VL - 165 IS - 11 N2 - Studies on obesity and prostate cancer risk are inconsistent, perhaps because of differential effects on aggressive and nonaggressive cancers. Participants included 34,754 men residing in Washington State (aged 50-76 years at baseline) in a prospective cohort study who were recruited between 2000 and 2002; 383 developed aggressive (regional/distant stage or Gleason sum 7-10) and 437 developed nonaggressive disease through December 2004. Compared with normal-weight men (body mass index (kg/m(2)) <25), obese men (> or = 30 kg/m(2)) had a reduced risk of nonaggressive disease (hazard ratio = 0.69, 95% confidence interval: 0.52, 0.93; p for trend = 0.01). Overweight men (25-29.9 kg/m(2)) had an increased risk of aggressive disease (hazard ratio = 1.4, 95% confidence interval: 1.1, 1.8), but there was no increased risk for obese men (p for trend = 0.69). Body mass index of >25 at age 18 years was associated with increased risk of aggressive prostate cancer; obesity at ages 30 and 45, but not 18, years was associated with reduced risk of nonaggressive prostate cancer. Height (fourth vs. first quartile) was associated with an increased risk of total prostate cancer (hazard ratio = 1.3, 95% confidence interval: 1.1, 1.6), which did not differ by aggressiveness. There were no associations of prostate cancer with age at which maximum height was reached. Results from this study demonstrate the complexity of prostate cancer epidemiology and the importance of examining risk factors by tumor characteristics. SN - 0002-9262 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17395597/Anthropometrics_and_prostate_cancer_risk_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/aje/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/aje/kwm013 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -