Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Urinary biomarkers to assess exposure of cats to environmental tobacco smoke.
Am J Vet Res 2007; 68(4):349-53AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the use of urinary biomarkers to assess exposure of cats to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS).

ANIMALS

61 healthy client-owned cats (19 from households in which smoking was reported and 42 from households in which there was no smoking).

PROCEDURES

Urine samples were obtained from each cat and assayed for total nicotine (nicotine plus nicotine glucuronide) and total cotinine (cotinine plus cotinine glucuronide) content by use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. In addition, total urinary content of 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL), a major metabolite of the tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone, was measured by use of gas chromatography with nitrosamine-selective detection.

RESULTS

Cats from households in which smoking was reported had significantly higher concentrations of total nicotine (70.4 ng/mL), total cotinine (8.53 ng/mL), and total NNAL (0.0562 pmol/mL) in urine, compared with concentrations for cats that lived in households in which there was no smoking (4.89 ng/mL, 0.74 ng/mL, and 0.0182 pmol/mL, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Analysis of these data provided biochemical evidence of exposure to ETS and uptake of tobacco-specific carcinogens by cats that live in households with smokers. Biomarkers could facilitate investigation of the health effects of ETS in cats and other species.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Minnesota Cancer Center, Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN 55108, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17397288

Citation

McNiel, Elizabeth A., et al. "Urinary Biomarkers to Assess Exposure of Cats to Environmental Tobacco Smoke." American Journal of Veterinary Research, vol. 68, no. 4, 2007, pp. 349-53.
McNiel EA, Carmella SG, Heath LA, et al. Urinary biomarkers to assess exposure of cats to environmental tobacco smoke. Am J Vet Res. 2007;68(4):349-53.
McNiel, E. A., Carmella, S. G., Heath, L. A., Bliss, R. L., Le, K. A., & Hecht, S. S. (2007). Urinary biomarkers to assess exposure of cats to environmental tobacco smoke. American Journal of Veterinary Research, 68(4), pp. 349-53.
McNiel EA, et al. Urinary Biomarkers to Assess Exposure of Cats to Environmental Tobacco Smoke. Am J Vet Res. 2007;68(4):349-53. PubMed PMID: 17397288.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Urinary biomarkers to assess exposure of cats to environmental tobacco smoke. AU - McNiel,Elizabeth A, AU - Carmella,Steven G, AU - Heath,Lori A, AU - Bliss,Robin L, AU - Le,Ky-Anh, AU - Hecht,Stephen S, PY - 2007/4/3/pubmed PY - 2007/7/28/medline PY - 2007/4/3/entrez SP - 349 EP - 53 JF - American journal of veterinary research JO - Am. J. Vet. Res. VL - 68 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the use of urinary biomarkers to assess exposure of cats to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). ANIMALS: 61 healthy client-owned cats (19 from households in which smoking was reported and 42 from households in which there was no smoking). PROCEDURES: Urine samples were obtained from each cat and assayed for total nicotine (nicotine plus nicotine glucuronide) and total cotinine (cotinine plus cotinine glucuronide) content by use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. In addition, total urinary content of 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL), a major metabolite of the tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone, was measured by use of gas chromatography with nitrosamine-selective detection. RESULTS: Cats from households in which smoking was reported had significantly higher concentrations of total nicotine (70.4 ng/mL), total cotinine (8.53 ng/mL), and total NNAL (0.0562 pmol/mL) in urine, compared with concentrations for cats that lived in households in which there was no smoking (4.89 ng/mL, 0.74 ng/mL, and 0.0182 pmol/mL, respectively). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Analysis of these data provided biochemical evidence of exposure to ETS and uptake of tobacco-specific carcinogens by cats that live in households with smokers. Biomarkers could facilitate investigation of the health effects of ETS in cats and other species. SN - 0002-9645 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17397288/Urinary_biomarkers_to_assess_exposure_of_cats_to_environmental_tobacco_smoke_ L2 - http://avmajournals.avma.org/doi/full/10.2460/ajvr.68.4.349?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -