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Jet lag: trends and coping strategies.
Lancet. 2007 Mar 31; 369(9567):1117-29.Lct

Abstract

The number of travellers undertaking long-distance flights has continued to increase. Such flights are associated with travel fatigue and jet lag, the symptoms of which are considered here, along with their similarities, differences, and causes. Difficulties with jet lag because of sleep loss and decreased performance are emphasised. Since jet lag is caused mainly by inappropriate timing of the body clock in the new time zone, the pertinent properties of the body clock are outlined, with a description of how the body clock can be adjusted. The methods, both pharmacological and behavioural, that have been used to alleviate the negative results of time-zone transitions, are reviewed. The results form the rationale for advice to travellers flying in different directions and crossing several time zones. Finally, there is an account of the main problems that remain unresolved.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, Henry Cotton Campus, Liverpool L3 2ET, UK. waterhouseathome@hotmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17398311

Citation

Waterhouse, Jim, et al. "Jet Lag: Trends and Coping Strategies." Lancet (London, England), vol. 369, no. 9567, 2007, pp. 1117-29.
Waterhouse J, Reilly T, Atkinson G, et al. Jet lag: trends and coping strategies. Lancet. 2007;369(9567):1117-29.
Waterhouse, J., Reilly, T., Atkinson, G., & Edwards, B. (2007). Jet lag: trends and coping strategies. Lancet (London, England), 369(9567), 1117-29.
Waterhouse J, et al. Jet Lag: Trends and Coping Strategies. Lancet. 2007 Mar 31;369(9567):1117-29. PubMed PMID: 17398311.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Jet lag: trends and coping strategies. AU - Waterhouse,Jim, AU - Reilly,Thomas, AU - Atkinson,Greg, AU - Edwards,Ben, PY - 2007/4/3/pubmed PY - 2007/4/14/medline PY - 2007/4/3/entrez SP - 1117 EP - 29 JF - Lancet (London, England) JO - Lancet VL - 369 IS - 9567 N2 - The number of travellers undertaking long-distance flights has continued to increase. Such flights are associated with travel fatigue and jet lag, the symptoms of which are considered here, along with their similarities, differences, and causes. Difficulties with jet lag because of sleep loss and decreased performance are emphasised. Since jet lag is caused mainly by inappropriate timing of the body clock in the new time zone, the pertinent properties of the body clock are outlined, with a description of how the body clock can be adjusted. The methods, both pharmacological and behavioural, that have been used to alleviate the negative results of time-zone transitions, are reviewed. The results form the rationale for advice to travellers flying in different directions and crossing several time zones. Finally, there is an account of the main problems that remain unresolved. SN - 1474-547X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17398311/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0140-6736(07)60529-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -