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sP-selectin plasma levels in obesity: association with insulin resistance and related metabolic and prothrombotic factors.
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2008 Mar; 18(3):227-32.NM

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIM

Soluble P-selectin (sP-sel) represents a marker of platelet activation. This study was addressed to investigate the associations of sP-sel plasma levels with anthropometric parameters, insulin resistance, and related metabolic and prothrombotic factors.

METHODS AND RESULTS

50 non-diabetic women, 17 with normal weight and 33 overweight and obese, aged 18-55 years, were examined. Measurements included body mass index (BMI), central fat accumulation (evaluated by waist circumference), systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels, fasting plasma concentrations of sP-sel, glucose, lipids (triglycerides, total cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol), insulin, and prothrombotic factors (plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, von Willebrand factor, fibrinogen), and insulin resistance (estimated by the homeostasis model assessment: HOMA(IR)). Overweight and obese women had higher fasting plasma sP-sel concentrations compared to normal-weight controls (P<0.05). sP-sel concentrations were positively correlated with BMI, HOMA(IR), systolic and diastolic blood pressure, fasting insulin, triglyceride and PAI-1 plasma levels (P<0.05 for all the correlations). When a multiple regression analysis was performed, with P-sel as dependent variable and all the other parameters as independent variables, P-sel did not maintain a significant relationship with any of these variables.

CONCLUSIONS

s-P-selectin plasma concentrations are higher in overweight and obese insulin resistant subjects, thus possibly contributing to the cardiovascular risk of these patients. However, body fatness and insulin resistance are not independent determinants of fasting plasma sP-sel concentrations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Internal Medicine, Endocrinology, and Metabolic Diseases, Department of Emergency and Organ Transplantation, University of Bari, School of Medicine, Piazza Giulio Cesare, 70124 Bari, Italy. g.depergola@endo.uniba.itNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17400434

Citation

De Pergola, G, et al. "SP-selectin Plasma Levels in Obesity: Association With Insulin Resistance and Related Metabolic and Prothrombotic Factors." Nutrition, Metabolism, and Cardiovascular Diseases : NMCD, vol. 18, no. 3, 2008, pp. 227-32.
De Pergola G, Pannacciulli N, Coviello M, et al. SP-selectin plasma levels in obesity: association with insulin resistance and related metabolic and prothrombotic factors. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2008;18(3):227-32.
De Pergola, G., Pannacciulli, N., Coviello, M., Scarangella, A., Di Roma, P., Caringella, M., Venneri, M. T., Quaranta, M., & Giorgino, R. (2008). SP-selectin plasma levels in obesity: association with insulin resistance and related metabolic and prothrombotic factors. Nutrition, Metabolism, and Cardiovascular Diseases : NMCD, 18(3), 227-32.
De Pergola G, et al. SP-selectin Plasma Levels in Obesity: Association With Insulin Resistance and Related Metabolic and Prothrombotic Factors. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2008;18(3):227-32. PubMed PMID: 17400434.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - sP-selectin plasma levels in obesity: association with insulin resistance and related metabolic and prothrombotic factors. AU - De Pergola,G, AU - Pannacciulli,N, AU - Coviello,M, AU - Scarangella,A, AU - Di Roma,P, AU - Caringella,M, AU - Venneri,M T, AU - Quaranta,M, AU - Giorgino,R, Y1 - 2007/04/02/ PY - 2006/03/01/received PY - 2006/07/12/revised PY - 2006/09/26/accepted PY - 2007/4/3/pubmed PY - 2008/4/16/medline PY - 2007/4/3/entrez SP - 227 EP - 32 JF - Nutrition, metabolism, and cardiovascular diseases : NMCD JO - Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis VL - 18 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND AND AIM: Soluble P-selectin (sP-sel) represents a marker of platelet activation. This study was addressed to investigate the associations of sP-sel plasma levels with anthropometric parameters, insulin resistance, and related metabolic and prothrombotic factors. METHODS AND RESULTS: 50 non-diabetic women, 17 with normal weight and 33 overweight and obese, aged 18-55 years, were examined. Measurements included body mass index (BMI), central fat accumulation (evaluated by waist circumference), systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels, fasting plasma concentrations of sP-sel, glucose, lipids (triglycerides, total cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol), insulin, and prothrombotic factors (plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, von Willebrand factor, fibrinogen), and insulin resistance (estimated by the homeostasis model assessment: HOMA(IR)). Overweight and obese women had higher fasting plasma sP-sel concentrations compared to normal-weight controls (P<0.05). sP-sel concentrations were positively correlated with BMI, HOMA(IR), systolic and diastolic blood pressure, fasting insulin, triglyceride and PAI-1 plasma levels (P<0.05 for all the correlations). When a multiple regression analysis was performed, with P-sel as dependent variable and all the other parameters as independent variables, P-sel did not maintain a significant relationship with any of these variables. CONCLUSIONS: s-P-selectin plasma concentrations are higher in overweight and obese insulin resistant subjects, thus possibly contributing to the cardiovascular risk of these patients. However, body fatness and insulin resistance are not independent determinants of fasting plasma sP-sel concentrations. SN - 1590-3729 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17400434/sP_selectin_plasma_levels_in_obesity:_association_with_insulin_resistance_and_related_metabolic_and_prothrombotic_factors_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0939-4753(06)00210-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -