Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Hot flushes, bone mineral density, and fractures in older postmenopausal women.
Obstet Gynecol. 2007 Apr; 109(4):841-7.OG

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess whether greater severity of hot flushes is associated with bone loss or fracture risk in older postmenopausal women.

METHODS

This study is a secondary analysis of 3,167 postmenopausal women in the Multiple Outcomes of Raloxifene Evaluation trial. Baseline hot flush severity was assessed by self-report. Femoral neck and lumbar spine bone density was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Vertebral and nonvertebral fractures were determined radiographically and by interview. Baseline bone density, 3-year bone loss, baseline prevalent fractures, and 3-year fracture incidence were examined in women with varying hot flush severity.

RESULTS

After adjusting for other characteristics, greater severity of hot flushes was associated with higher, rather than lower, baseline bone density (adjusted mean femoral neck bone density=0.633, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.614-0.652 g/cm2, versus 0.611, 95% CI 0.608-0.613 g/cm2 for women with "severe" versus "minimal" hot flushes). Women with more severe hot flushes were less likely to have a baseline fracture (odds ratio 0.64, 95% CI 0.48-0.84, for vertebral fracture in women with moderate or severe versus minimal hot flushes). The 3-year annualized change in bone density did not differ among women with varying hot flush severity (P>.40 for all). Hot flush severity was not related to incident vertebral or nonvertebral fracture (P>.05 for all).

CONCLUSION

Among osteoporotic women who are 5 or more years postmenopausal, greater severity of persistent hot flushes is not associated with progressive bone loss or risk of fracture, despite previous research linking hot flushes to bone loss during early menopause.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE

II.

Authors+Show Affiliations

San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94121, USA. ahuang@ucsfmed.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17400844

Citation

Huang, Alison, et al. "Hot Flushes, Bone Mineral Density, and Fractures in Older Postmenopausal Women." Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 109, no. 4, 2007, pp. 841-7.
Huang A, Grady D, Blackwell T, et al. Hot flushes, bone mineral density, and fractures in older postmenopausal women. Obstet Gynecol. 2007;109(4):841-7.
Huang, A., Grady, D., Blackwell, T., & Bauer, D. (2007). Hot flushes, bone mineral density, and fractures in older postmenopausal women. Obstetrics and Gynecology, 109(4), 841-7.
Huang A, et al. Hot Flushes, Bone Mineral Density, and Fractures in Older Postmenopausal Women. Obstet Gynecol. 2007;109(4):841-7. PubMed PMID: 17400844.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hot flushes, bone mineral density, and fractures in older postmenopausal women. AU - Huang,Alison, AU - Grady,Deborah, AU - Blackwell,Terri, AU - Bauer,Douglas, PY - 2007/4/3/pubmed PY - 2007/4/27/medline PY - 2007/4/3/entrez SP - 841 EP - 7 JF - Obstetrics and gynecology JO - Obstet Gynecol VL - 109 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To assess whether greater severity of hot flushes is associated with bone loss or fracture risk in older postmenopausal women. METHODS: This study is a secondary analysis of 3,167 postmenopausal women in the Multiple Outcomes of Raloxifene Evaluation trial. Baseline hot flush severity was assessed by self-report. Femoral neck and lumbar spine bone density was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Vertebral and nonvertebral fractures were determined radiographically and by interview. Baseline bone density, 3-year bone loss, baseline prevalent fractures, and 3-year fracture incidence were examined in women with varying hot flush severity. RESULTS: After adjusting for other characteristics, greater severity of hot flushes was associated with higher, rather than lower, baseline bone density (adjusted mean femoral neck bone density=0.633, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.614-0.652 g/cm2, versus 0.611, 95% CI 0.608-0.613 g/cm2 for women with "severe" versus "minimal" hot flushes). Women with more severe hot flushes were less likely to have a baseline fracture (odds ratio 0.64, 95% CI 0.48-0.84, for vertebral fracture in women with moderate or severe versus minimal hot flushes). The 3-year annualized change in bone density did not differ among women with varying hot flush severity (P>.40 for all). Hot flush severity was not related to incident vertebral or nonvertebral fracture (P>.05 for all). CONCLUSION: Among osteoporotic women who are 5 or more years postmenopausal, greater severity of persistent hot flushes is not associated with progressive bone loss or risk of fracture, despite previous research linking hot flushes to bone loss during early menopause. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: II. SN - 0029-7844 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17400844/Hot_flushes_bone_mineral_density_and_fractures_in_older_postmenopausal_women_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=17400844.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -