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Effects of oral electrolyte supplementation on endurance horses competing in 80 km rides.
Equine Vet J Suppl. 2006 AugEV

Abstract

REASONS FOR PERFORMING STUDY

There is no evidence that use of oral electrolyte pastes enhances performance in competing endurance horses.

OBJECTIVE

To ascertain whether oral administration of a high dose (HD) of sodium chloride (NaCl) and potassium chloride (KCl) to endurance horses would differentially increase water intake, attenuate bodyweight (bwt) loss and improve performance when compared to a low dose (LD).

METHODS

A randomised, blinded, crossover study was conducted on 8 horses participating in two 80 km rides (same course, 28 days apart). Thirty minutes before and at 40 km of the first ride 4, horses received orally 02 g NaCl/kg bwt and 0.07 g KCl/kg bwt. The other 4 received 0.07 g NaCl/kg bwt and 0.02 g KCl/kg bwt. Horses received the alternate treatment in the second ride. Data were analysed with 2-way ANOVA for repeated measures (P<0.05).

RESULTS

Estimated water intake was significantly greater with HD both at the 40 km mark and as total water intake; however, differences in bwt loss and speed between HD and LD were not found. Treatment significantly affected serum Na+, Cl-, HCO3, pH and water intake, but not serum K+ or bwt. Serum Na+ and Cl- were significantly higher at 80 km when horses received HD, but no differences were found in early recovery. Venous HCO3- and pH were significantly lower throughout the ride and in early recovery when horses received HD.

CONCLUSIONS AND POTENTIAL RELEVANCE

Other than enhancing water intake, supplementing endurance horses with high doses of NaCI and KCl did not provide any detectable competitive advantage in 80 km rides. Further, the elevated serum electrolyte concentrations induced with HD might not be appropriate for endurance horses.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Veterinary Clinical Sciences, The Ohio State University Columbus, Ohio, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17402386

Citation

Sampieri, F, et al. "Effects of Oral Electrolyte Supplementation On Endurance Horses Competing in 80 Km Rides." Equine Veterinary Journal. Supplement, 2006, pp. 19-26.
Sampieri F, Schott HC, Hinchcliff KW, et al. Effects of oral electrolyte supplementation on endurance horses competing in 80 km rides. Equine Vet J Suppl. 2006.
Sampieri, F., Schott, H. C., Hinchcliff, K. W., Geor, R. J., & Jose-Cunilleras, E. (2006). Effects of oral electrolyte supplementation on endurance horses competing in 80 km rides. Equine Veterinary Journal. Supplement, (36), 19-26.
Sampieri F, et al. Effects of Oral Electrolyte Supplementation On Endurance Horses Competing in 80 Km Rides. Equine Vet J Suppl. 2006;(36)19-26. PubMed PMID: 17402386.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of oral electrolyte supplementation on endurance horses competing in 80 km rides. AU - Sampieri,F, AU - Schott,H C,2nd AU - Hinchcliff,K W, AU - Geor,R J, AU - Jose-Cunilleras,E, PY - 2007/4/4/pubmed PY - 2007/5/3/medline PY - 2007/4/4/entrez SP - 19 EP - 26 JF - Equine veterinary journal. Supplement JO - Equine Vet J Suppl IS - 36 N2 - REASONS FOR PERFORMING STUDY: There is no evidence that use of oral electrolyte pastes enhances performance in competing endurance horses. OBJECTIVE: To ascertain whether oral administration of a high dose (HD) of sodium chloride (NaCl) and potassium chloride (KCl) to endurance horses would differentially increase water intake, attenuate bodyweight (bwt) loss and improve performance when compared to a low dose (LD). METHODS: A randomised, blinded, crossover study was conducted on 8 horses participating in two 80 km rides (same course, 28 days apart). Thirty minutes before and at 40 km of the first ride 4, horses received orally 02 g NaCl/kg bwt and 0.07 g KCl/kg bwt. The other 4 received 0.07 g NaCl/kg bwt and 0.02 g KCl/kg bwt. Horses received the alternate treatment in the second ride. Data were analysed with 2-way ANOVA for repeated measures (P<0.05). RESULTS: Estimated water intake was significantly greater with HD both at the 40 km mark and as total water intake; however, differences in bwt loss and speed between HD and LD were not found. Treatment significantly affected serum Na+, Cl-, HCO3, pH and water intake, but not serum K+ or bwt. Serum Na+ and Cl- were significantly higher at 80 km when horses received HD, but no differences were found in early recovery. Venous HCO3- and pH were significantly lower throughout the ride and in early recovery when horses received HD. CONCLUSIONS AND POTENTIAL RELEVANCE: Other than enhancing water intake, supplementing endurance horses with high doses of NaCI and KCl did not provide any detectable competitive advantage in 80 km rides. Further, the elevated serum electrolyte concentrations induced with HD might not be appropriate for endurance horses. UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17402386/Effects_of_oral_electrolyte_supplementation_on_endurance_horses_competing_in_80_km_rides_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -