Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Harnessed vs. mounted standardbreds on the track: changes in gait and physiological variables.
Equine Vet J Suppl. 2006 AugEV

Abstract

REASONS FOR PERFORMING STUDY

It has become apparent through analysis of elite races over the past 20 years that mounted races are always slower than harnessed races when performed by the same horses over the same distances on the same tracks.

OBJECTIVES

To investigate and compare physiological and gait variables in mounted and harnessed activities in trotters.

METHODS

Ten trotters were taken at random in 2 standardised field exercise tests one week apart: a harnessed and a mounted test with standardised weight jockeys and drivers. Speed, heart rate (HR), respiratory frequency (RF), blood lactate concentration (La), stride characteristics (length, frequency [SF], symmetry, regularity, dorsoventral displacement of the sternum and vertical, longitudinal and lateral activities measuring the amount of deceleration and acceleration along the 3 axis) were measured.

RESULTS

Paired t tests and an analysis of variance were calculated between the 2 conditions and revealed that V4 (speed for a La of 4 mmol/I), V200 (speed for a HR of 200 beats/min), stride length, trot symmetry, lateral activity were lower in the mounted condition. In contrast, RF, SF, dorsoventral displacement, vertical and longitudinal activities were significantly higher in mounted horses compared to harnessed horses.

CONCLUSION

The significant physiological and biomechanical differences between pulling whilst harnessed and being ridden reflect an increase in the energy requirement of locomotion in the mounted condition compared to the harnessed condition. Trotting mounted at maximal speed is more demanding for the horse than harnessed as reflected by the lower V4 and V200 and some gait variables change in relation to this phenomenon.

POTENTIAL RELEVANCE

This study demonstrates that trotting mounted at sub-maximum and maximum speed is more demanding for the horse when ridden and that it modifies some gait variables, either as a result or even as a possible cause.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Pégase Mayenne, Département de Médecine du Sport, Centre Hospitalier, 53 015 Laval, France.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17402468

Citation

Mottini, V, et al. "Harnessed Vs. Mounted Standardbreds On the Track: Changes in Gait and Physiological Variables." Equine Veterinary Journal. Supplement, 2006, pp. 468-72.
Mottini V, Leleu C, Cotrel C. Harnessed vs. mounted standardbreds on the track: changes in gait and physiological variables. Equine Vet J Suppl. 2006.
Mottini, V., Leleu, C., & Cotrel, C. (2006). Harnessed vs. mounted standardbreds on the track: changes in gait and physiological variables. Equine Veterinary Journal. Supplement, (36), 468-72.
Mottini V, Leleu C, Cotrel C. Harnessed Vs. Mounted Standardbreds On the Track: Changes in Gait and Physiological Variables. Equine Vet J Suppl. 2006;(36)468-72. PubMed PMID: 17402468.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Harnessed vs. mounted standardbreds on the track: changes in gait and physiological variables. AU - Mottini,V, AU - Leleu,C, AU - Cotrel,C, PY - 2007/4/4/pubmed PY - 2007/5/3/medline PY - 2007/4/4/entrez SP - 468 EP - 72 JF - Equine veterinary journal. Supplement JO - Equine Vet J Suppl IS - 36 N2 - REASONS FOR PERFORMING STUDY: It has become apparent through analysis of elite races over the past 20 years that mounted races are always slower than harnessed races when performed by the same horses over the same distances on the same tracks. OBJECTIVES: To investigate and compare physiological and gait variables in mounted and harnessed activities in trotters. METHODS: Ten trotters were taken at random in 2 standardised field exercise tests one week apart: a harnessed and a mounted test with standardised weight jockeys and drivers. Speed, heart rate (HR), respiratory frequency (RF), blood lactate concentration (La), stride characteristics (length, frequency [SF], symmetry, regularity, dorsoventral displacement of the sternum and vertical, longitudinal and lateral activities measuring the amount of deceleration and acceleration along the 3 axis) were measured. RESULTS: Paired t tests and an analysis of variance were calculated between the 2 conditions and revealed that V4 (speed for a La of 4 mmol/I), V200 (speed for a HR of 200 beats/min), stride length, trot symmetry, lateral activity were lower in the mounted condition. In contrast, RF, SF, dorsoventral displacement, vertical and longitudinal activities were significantly higher in mounted horses compared to harnessed horses. CONCLUSION: The significant physiological and biomechanical differences between pulling whilst harnessed and being ridden reflect an increase in the energy requirement of locomotion in the mounted condition compared to the harnessed condition. Trotting mounted at maximal speed is more demanding for the horse than harnessed as reflected by the lower V4 and V200 and some gait variables change in relation to this phenomenon. POTENTIAL RELEVANCE: This study demonstrates that trotting mounted at sub-maximum and maximum speed is more demanding for the horse when ridden and that it modifies some gait variables, either as a result or even as a possible cause. UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17402468/Harnessed_vs__mounted_standardbreds_on_the_track:_changes_in_gait_and_physiological_variables_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.2042-3306.2006.tb05589.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -