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Epidemiology and consequences of women's revictimization.
Womens Health Issues. 2007 Mar-Apr; 17(2):101-6.WH

Abstract

This study uses Kraemer's approach for nonrandom comorbidity to identify the parameters of revictimization among women, using a diverse, population-based sample. Participants (n = 11,056) are from the California Women's Health Survey. Women were asked about childhood and adult violence and current symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and anxiety. Logistic regressions adjusted for age, ethnicity, education, and poverty indicate that women who experienced childhood physical or sexual abuse were 5.8 (95% confidence interval, 5.2-6.4) times more likely to experience adult physical or sexual victimization. Revictimization affected 12% of women, and these women were substantially more likely to report current symptoms of anxiety, depression, and PTSD than women exposed to violence only in childhood or only as an adult. Revictimization is a methodologically distinct concept and is a potent risk factor for adult mental health problems. Prevention should target women exposed to both physical and sexual assault.

Authors+Show Affiliations

VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA. Rachel.kimerling@med.va.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17403467

Citation

Kimerling, Rachel, et al. "Epidemiology and Consequences of Women's Revictimization." Women's Health Issues : Official Publication of the Jacobs Institute of Women's Health, vol. 17, no. 2, 2007, pp. 101-6.
Kimerling R, Alvarez J, Pavao J, et al. Epidemiology and consequences of women's revictimization. Womens Health Issues. 2007;17(2):101-6.
Kimerling, R., Alvarez, J., Pavao, J., Kaminski, A., & Baumrind, N. (2007). Epidemiology and consequences of women's revictimization. Women's Health Issues : Official Publication of the Jacobs Institute of Women's Health, 17(2), 101-6.
Kimerling R, et al. Epidemiology and Consequences of Women's Revictimization. Womens Health Issues. 2007 Mar-Apr;17(2):101-6. PubMed PMID: 17403467.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Epidemiology and consequences of women's revictimization. AU - Kimerling,Rachel, AU - Alvarez,Jennifer, AU - Pavao,Joanne, AU - Kaminski,Amy, AU - Baumrind,Nikki, PY - 2005/08/18/received PY - 2006/10/05/revised PY - 2006/11/28/accepted PY - 2007/4/4/pubmed PY - 2007/6/15/medline PY - 2007/4/4/entrez SP - 101 EP - 6 JF - Women's health issues : official publication of the Jacobs Institute of Women's Health JO - Womens Health Issues VL - 17 IS - 2 N2 - This study uses Kraemer's approach for nonrandom comorbidity to identify the parameters of revictimization among women, using a diverse, population-based sample. Participants (n = 11,056) are from the California Women's Health Survey. Women were asked about childhood and adult violence and current symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and anxiety. Logistic regressions adjusted for age, ethnicity, education, and poverty indicate that women who experienced childhood physical or sexual abuse were 5.8 (95% confidence interval, 5.2-6.4) times more likely to experience adult physical or sexual victimization. Revictimization affected 12% of women, and these women were substantially more likely to report current symptoms of anxiety, depression, and PTSD than women exposed to violence only in childhood or only as an adult. Revictimization is a methodologically distinct concept and is a potent risk factor for adult mental health problems. Prevention should target women exposed to both physical and sexual assault. SN - 1049-3867 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17403467/Epidemiology_and_consequences_of_women's_revictimization_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1049-3867(06)00139-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -