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Meat consumption and risk of breast cancer in the UK Women's Cohort Study.

Abstract

We performed a survival analysis to assess the effect of meat consumption and meat type on the risk of breast cancer in the UK Women's Cohort Study. Between 1995 and 1998 a cohort of 35 372 women was recruited, aged between 35 and 69 years with a wide range of dietary intakes, assessed by a 217-item food frequency questionnaire. Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated using Cox regression adjusted for known confounders. High consumption of total meat compared with none was associated with premenopausal breast cancer, HR=1.20 (95% CI: 0.86-1.68), and high non-processed meat intake compared with none, HR=1.20 (95% CI: 0.86-1.68). Larger effect sizes were found in postmenopausal women for all meat types, with significant associations with total, processed and red meat consumption. Processed meat showed the strongest HR=1.64 (95% CI: 1.14-2.37) for high consumption compared with none. Women, both pre- and postmenopausal, who consumed the most meat had the highest risk of breast cancer.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Nutritional Epidemiology Group, 30-32 Hyde Terrace, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.

    , ,

    Source

    British journal of cancer 96:7 2007 Apr 10 pg 1139-46

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Breast Neoplasms
    Case-Control Studies
    Cohort Studies
    Diet Surveys
    Female
    Humans
    Meat Products
    Middle Aged
    Risk Factors
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    United Kingdom

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    17406351

    Citation

    Taylor, E F., et al. "Meat Consumption and Risk of Breast Cancer in the UK Women's Cohort Study." British Journal of Cancer, vol. 96, no. 7, 2007, pp. 1139-46.
    Taylor EF, Burley VJ, Greenwood DC, et al. Meat consumption and risk of breast cancer in the UK Women's Cohort Study. Br J Cancer. 2007;96(7):1139-46.
    Taylor, E. F., Burley, V. J., Greenwood, D. C., & Cade, J. E. (2007). Meat consumption and risk of breast cancer in the UK Women's Cohort Study. British Journal of Cancer, 96(7), pp. 1139-46.
    Taylor EF, et al. Meat Consumption and Risk of Breast Cancer in the UK Women's Cohort Study. Br J Cancer. 2007 Apr 10;96(7):1139-46. PubMed PMID: 17406351.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Meat consumption and risk of breast cancer in the UK Women's Cohort Study. AU - Taylor,E F, AU - Burley,V J, AU - Greenwood,D C, AU - Cade,J E, PY - 2007/4/5/pubmed PY - 2007/6/1/medline PY - 2007/4/5/entrez SP - 1139 EP - 46 JF - British journal of cancer JO - Br. J. Cancer VL - 96 IS - 7 N2 - We performed a survival analysis to assess the effect of meat consumption and meat type on the risk of breast cancer in the UK Women's Cohort Study. Between 1995 and 1998 a cohort of 35 372 women was recruited, aged between 35 and 69 years with a wide range of dietary intakes, assessed by a 217-item food frequency questionnaire. Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated using Cox regression adjusted for known confounders. High consumption of total meat compared with none was associated with premenopausal breast cancer, HR=1.20 (95% CI: 0.86-1.68), and high non-processed meat intake compared with none, HR=1.20 (95% CI: 0.86-1.68). Larger effect sizes were found in postmenopausal women for all meat types, with significant associations with total, processed and red meat consumption. Processed meat showed the strongest HR=1.64 (95% CI: 1.14-2.37) for high consumption compared with none. Women, both pre- and postmenopausal, who consumed the most meat had the highest risk of breast cancer. SN - 0007-0920 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17406351/full_citation L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.bjc.6603689 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -