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Neuronal responsiveness to central Na+ in 2 congenic strains of Dahl salt-sensitive rats.
Hypertension 2007; 49(6):1315-20H

Abstract

Dahl salt-sensitive rats show increased Na(+) entry into the brain on high salt intake and increased sympathetic and pressor responses to central Na(+). We examined C10QTL2 and C17QTL to test whether they contribute to these phenotypes. In Dahl salt-sensitive, Lewis, and C10S.L16, and C17S.L2 congenic rats on a high salt diet for 8 to 10 days, blood pressure and heart rate were higher in Dahl salt-sensitive versus others and in C10S.L16 and C17S.L2 versus Lewis rats. Cerebrospinal fluid [Na(+)] increased by approximately 5 mmol/L in Dahl salt-sensitive, C10S.L16, and C17S.L2 compared with Lewis rats. In rats on a regular salt diet, 8-minute intracerebroventricular infusions of artificial cerebrospinal fluid with increasing [Na(+)] caused increases in blood pressure, heart rate, and renal sympathetic nerve activity, which were approximately 90% larger in Dahl salt-sensitive and C17S.L2 versus Lewis rats and only 35% to 45% larger in C10S.L16 versus Lewis rats. In another set of rats on regular salt, blood pressure and heart rate were recorded by telemetry before and during intracerebroventricular infusion of Na(+)-rich cerebrospinal fluid for 14 days. Na(+)-rich cerebrospinal fluid caused significantly larger increases in blood pressure and heart rate, larger responses to air stress and more impairment of baroreflex in Dahl salt-sensitive and C17S.L2 rats versus Lewis rats. In contrast, responses in C10S.L16 rats were similar to those in Lewis rats. These data suggest that, in Dahl salt-sensitive rats, genetic variants in C10QTL2 but not C17QTL contribute to increased neuronal responsiveness to cerebrospinal fluid [Na(+)]. However, neither of them contributes to the increase in cerebrospinal fluid [Na(+)] induced by high salt.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17420333

Citation

Huang, Bing S., et al. "Neuronal Responsiveness to Central Na+ in 2 Congenic Strains of Dahl Salt-sensitive Rats." Hypertension (Dallas, Tex. : 1979), vol. 49, no. 6, 2007, pp. 1315-20.
Huang BS, Ahmad M, Deng AY, et al. Neuronal responsiveness to central Na+ in 2 congenic strains of Dahl salt-sensitive rats. Hypertension. 2007;49(6):1315-20.
Huang, B. S., Ahmad, M., Deng, A. Y., & Leenen, F. H. (2007). Neuronal responsiveness to central Na+ in 2 congenic strains of Dahl salt-sensitive rats. Hypertension (Dallas, Tex. : 1979), 49(6), pp. 1315-20.
Huang BS, et al. Neuronal Responsiveness to Central Na+ in 2 Congenic Strains of Dahl Salt-sensitive Rats. Hypertension. 2007;49(6):1315-20. PubMed PMID: 17420333.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Neuronal responsiveness to central Na+ in 2 congenic strains of Dahl salt-sensitive rats. AU - Huang,Bing S, AU - Ahmad,Monir, AU - Deng,Alan Y, AU - Leenen,Frans H H, Y1 - 2007/04/09/ PY - 2007/4/11/pubmed PY - 2007/6/21/medline PY - 2007/4/11/entrez SP - 1315 EP - 20 JF - Hypertension (Dallas, Tex. : 1979) JO - Hypertension VL - 49 IS - 6 N2 - Dahl salt-sensitive rats show increased Na(+) entry into the brain on high salt intake and increased sympathetic and pressor responses to central Na(+). We examined C10QTL2 and C17QTL to test whether they contribute to these phenotypes. In Dahl salt-sensitive, Lewis, and C10S.L16, and C17S.L2 congenic rats on a high salt diet for 8 to 10 days, blood pressure and heart rate were higher in Dahl salt-sensitive versus others and in C10S.L16 and C17S.L2 versus Lewis rats. Cerebrospinal fluid [Na(+)] increased by approximately 5 mmol/L in Dahl salt-sensitive, C10S.L16, and C17S.L2 compared with Lewis rats. In rats on a regular salt diet, 8-minute intracerebroventricular infusions of artificial cerebrospinal fluid with increasing [Na(+)] caused increases in blood pressure, heart rate, and renal sympathetic nerve activity, which were approximately 90% larger in Dahl salt-sensitive and C17S.L2 versus Lewis rats and only 35% to 45% larger in C10S.L16 versus Lewis rats. In another set of rats on regular salt, blood pressure and heart rate were recorded by telemetry before and during intracerebroventricular infusion of Na(+)-rich cerebrospinal fluid for 14 days. Na(+)-rich cerebrospinal fluid caused significantly larger increases in blood pressure and heart rate, larger responses to air stress and more impairment of baroreflex in Dahl salt-sensitive and C17S.L2 rats versus Lewis rats. In contrast, responses in C10S.L16 rats were similar to those in Lewis rats. These data suggest that, in Dahl salt-sensitive rats, genetic variants in C10QTL2 but not C17QTL contribute to increased neuronal responsiveness to cerebrospinal fluid [Na(+)]. However, neither of them contributes to the increase in cerebrospinal fluid [Na(+)] induced by high salt. SN - 1524-4563 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17420333/Neuronal_responsiveness_to_central_Na+_in_2_congenic_strains_of_Dahl_salt_sensitive_rats_ L2 - http://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.106.086363?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -