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Viscoelasticity of the human red blood cell.
Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 2007; 293(2):C597-605AJ

Abstract

We report here the first measurements of the complex modulus of the isolated red blood cell (RBC). Because the RBC is often larger than capillary diameter, important determinants of microcirculatory function are RBC deformability and its changes with pathologies, such as sickle cell disease and malaria. A functionalized ferrimagnetic microbead was attached to the membrane of healthy RBC and then subjected to an oscillatory magnetic field. The resulting torque caused cell deformation. From the oscillatory forcing and resulting bead motions, which were tracked optically, we computed elastic and frictional moduli, g' and g", respectively, from 0.1 to 100 Hz. The g' was nearly frequency independent and dominated the response at all but the highest frequencies measured. Over three frequency decades, g" increased as a power law with an exponent of 0.64, a result not predicted by any simple model. These data suggest that RBC relaxation times that have been reported previously, and any models that rest upon them, are artifactual; the artifact, we suggest, arises from forcing to an exponential fit data of limited temporal duration. A linear range of response was observed, but, as forcing amplitude increased, nonlinearities became clearly apparent. A finite element model suggests that membrane bending was localized to the vicinity of the bead and dominated membrane shear. While the mechanisms accounting for these RBC dynamics remain unclear, methods described here establish new avenues for the exploration of connections among the mechanical, chemical, and biological characteristics of the RBC in health and disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Program in Molecular and Integrative Physiological Sciences (MIPS Dept of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA. mpuigdem@hsph.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17428838

Citation

Puig-de-Morales-Marinkovic, Marina, et al. "Viscoelasticity of the Human Red Blood Cell." American Journal of Physiology. Cell Physiology, vol. 293, no. 2, 2007, pp. C597-605.
Puig-de-Morales-Marinkovic M, Turner KT, Butler JP, et al. Viscoelasticity of the human red blood cell. Am J Physiol, Cell Physiol. 2007;293(2):C597-605.
Puig-de-Morales-Marinkovic, M., Turner, K. T., Butler, J. P., Fredberg, J. J., & Suresh, S. (2007). Viscoelasticity of the human red blood cell. American Journal of Physiology. Cell Physiology, 293(2), pp. C597-605.
Puig-de-Morales-Marinkovic M, et al. Viscoelasticity of the Human Red Blood Cell. Am J Physiol, Cell Physiol. 2007;293(2):C597-605. PubMed PMID: 17428838.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Viscoelasticity of the human red blood cell. AU - Puig-de-Morales-Marinkovic,Marina, AU - Turner,Kevin T, AU - Butler,James P, AU - Fredberg,Jeffrey J, AU - Suresh,Subra, Y1 - 2007/04/11/ PY - 2007/4/13/pubmed PY - 2007/9/21/medline PY - 2007/4/13/entrez SP - C597 EP - 605 JF - American journal of physiology. Cell physiology JO - Am. J. Physiol., Cell Physiol. VL - 293 IS - 2 N2 - We report here the first measurements of the complex modulus of the isolated red blood cell (RBC). Because the RBC is often larger than capillary diameter, important determinants of microcirculatory function are RBC deformability and its changes with pathologies, such as sickle cell disease and malaria. A functionalized ferrimagnetic microbead was attached to the membrane of healthy RBC and then subjected to an oscillatory magnetic field. The resulting torque caused cell deformation. From the oscillatory forcing and resulting bead motions, which were tracked optically, we computed elastic and frictional moduli, g' and g", respectively, from 0.1 to 100 Hz. The g' was nearly frequency independent and dominated the response at all but the highest frequencies measured. Over three frequency decades, g" increased as a power law with an exponent of 0.64, a result not predicted by any simple model. These data suggest that RBC relaxation times that have been reported previously, and any models that rest upon them, are artifactual; the artifact, we suggest, arises from forcing to an exponential fit data of limited temporal duration. A linear range of response was observed, but, as forcing amplitude increased, nonlinearities became clearly apparent. A finite element model suggests that membrane bending was localized to the vicinity of the bead and dominated membrane shear. While the mechanisms accounting for these RBC dynamics remain unclear, methods described here establish new avenues for the exploration of connections among the mechanical, chemical, and biological characteristics of the RBC in health and disease. SN - 0363-6143 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17428838/Viscoelasticity_of_the_human_red_blood_cell_ L2 - http://www.physiology.org/doi/full/10.1152/ajpcell.00562.2006?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -