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Use of alternative and complementary therapies by inflammatory bowel disease patients in an Italian tertiary referral centre.
Dig Liver Dis. 2007 Jun; 39(6):524-9.DL

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Alternative and complementary therapies are increasingly used by patients with inflammatory bowel disease, but no data are available on their use in Italy.

AIM

To ascertain the prevalence and pattern of the use of alternative and complementary therapies, and demographic and clinical factors associated with their use in a large sample of Italian inflammatory bowel disease patients.

METHODS

A structured questionnaire was administered to a cohort of outpatients at a tertiary referral centre.

RESULTS

Five hundred and fifty-two patients completed the questionnaire; 156 (28%) reported using alternative and complementary therapies, which mainly involved homeopathy (43.6%), followed by controlled diets or dietary supplements (35.5%), herbs (28.2%), exercise (25.6%) and prayer (14.7%). Alternative and complementary therapies were used to ameliorate intestinal symptoms (52.5%), in the hope of being cured (41%) and to reduce the intake of drugs (39.7%). An improvement in well-being (45.5%) and inflammatory bowel disease symptoms (40.3%) were the most commonly reported benefits. A higher education (p=0.027), a more frequently relapsing disease (p=0.001) and dissatisfaction with the doctor's communication (p=0.001) correlated with alternative and complementary therapy use. Non-compliance with conventional drugs, disease severity and curiosity regarding novel therapies were predictors of alternative and complementary therapy use.

CONCLUSIONS

Alternative and complementary therapies are frequently used by Italian inflammatory bowel disease patients. Doctors should improve their empathy and their understanding about possible benefits of alternative and complementary therapies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Padua, Department of Surgical and Gastroenterological Sciences, via 8 Febbraio, Padova, Italy. dinca@unipd.itNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17433794

Citation

D'Inca, R, et al. "Use of Alternative and Complementary Therapies By Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients in an Italian Tertiary Referral Centre." Digestive and Liver Disease : Official Journal of the Italian Society of Gastroenterology and the Italian Association for the Study of the Liver, vol. 39, no. 6, 2007, pp. 524-9.
D'Inca R, Garribba AT, Vettorato MG, et al. Use of alternative and complementary therapies by inflammatory bowel disease patients in an Italian tertiary referral centre. Dig Liver Dis. 2007;39(6):524-9.
D'Inca, R., Garribba, A. T., Vettorato, M. G., Martin, A., Martines, D., Di Leo, V., Buda, A., & Sturniolo, G. C. (2007). Use of alternative and complementary therapies by inflammatory bowel disease patients in an Italian tertiary referral centre. Digestive and Liver Disease : Official Journal of the Italian Society of Gastroenterology and the Italian Association for the Study of the Liver, 39(6), 524-9.
D'Inca R, et al. Use of Alternative and Complementary Therapies By Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients in an Italian Tertiary Referral Centre. Dig Liver Dis. 2007;39(6):524-9. PubMed PMID: 17433794.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Use of alternative and complementary therapies by inflammatory bowel disease patients in an Italian tertiary referral centre. AU - D'Inca,R, AU - Garribba,A T, AU - Vettorato,M G, AU - Martin,A, AU - Martines,D, AU - Di Leo,V, AU - Buda,A, AU - Sturniolo,G C, Y1 - 2007/04/11/ PY - 2006/11/13/received PY - 2007/01/25/revised PY - 2007/03/01/accepted PY - 2007/4/17/pubmed PY - 2007/8/19/medline PY - 2007/4/17/entrez SP - 524 EP - 9 JF - Digestive and liver disease : official journal of the Italian Society of Gastroenterology and the Italian Association for the Study of the Liver JO - Dig Liver Dis VL - 39 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Alternative and complementary therapies are increasingly used by patients with inflammatory bowel disease, but no data are available on their use in Italy. AIM: To ascertain the prevalence and pattern of the use of alternative and complementary therapies, and demographic and clinical factors associated with their use in a large sample of Italian inflammatory bowel disease patients. METHODS: A structured questionnaire was administered to a cohort of outpatients at a tertiary referral centre. RESULTS: Five hundred and fifty-two patients completed the questionnaire; 156 (28%) reported using alternative and complementary therapies, which mainly involved homeopathy (43.6%), followed by controlled diets or dietary supplements (35.5%), herbs (28.2%), exercise (25.6%) and prayer (14.7%). Alternative and complementary therapies were used to ameliorate intestinal symptoms (52.5%), in the hope of being cured (41%) and to reduce the intake of drugs (39.7%). An improvement in well-being (45.5%) and inflammatory bowel disease symptoms (40.3%) were the most commonly reported benefits. A higher education (p=0.027), a more frequently relapsing disease (p=0.001) and dissatisfaction with the doctor's communication (p=0.001) correlated with alternative and complementary therapy use. Non-compliance with conventional drugs, disease severity and curiosity regarding novel therapies were predictors of alternative and complementary therapy use. CONCLUSIONS: Alternative and complementary therapies are frequently used by Italian inflammatory bowel disease patients. Doctors should improve their empathy and their understanding about possible benefits of alternative and complementary therapies. SN - 1590-8658 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17433794/Use_of_alternative_and_complementary_therapies_by_inflammatory_bowel_disease_patients_in_an_Italian_tertiary_referral_centre_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1590-8658(07)00080-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -