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Creative cognition: the diverse operations and the prospect of applying a cognitive neuroscience perspective.
Methods 2007; 42(1):38-48M

Abstract

Creativity is defined quite simply as "the ability to create" in most lexicons, but, in reality, this is a complex and heterogeneous construct about which there is much to be discovered. The cognitive approach to investigating creativity recognizes and seeks to understand this complexity by investigating the component processes involved in creative thinking. The cognitive neuroscience approach, which has only limitedly been applied in the study of creativity, should ideally build on these ideas in uncovering the neural substrates of these processes. Following an introduction into the early experimental ideas and the cognitive approach to creativity, we discuss the theoretical background and behavioral methods for testing various processes of creative cognition, including conceptual expansion, the constraining influence of examples, creative imagery and insight. The complex relations between the underlying component processes of originality and relevance across these tasks are presented thereafter. We then outline how some of these conceptual distinctions can be evaluated by neuroscientific evidence and elaborate on the neuropsychological approach in the study of creativity. Given the current state of affairs, our recommendation is that despite methodological difficulties that are associated with investigating creativity, adopting the cognitive neuroscience perspective is a highly promising framework for validating and expanding on the critical issues that have been raised in this paper.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Max Planck Institute for Human Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Stephanstr. 1a, D-04103 Leipzig, Germany. abraham@cbs.mpg.deNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17434414

Citation

Abraham, Anna, and Sabine Windmann. "Creative Cognition: the Diverse Operations and the Prospect of Applying a Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective." Methods (San Diego, Calif.), vol. 42, no. 1, 2007, pp. 38-48.
Abraham A, Windmann S. Creative cognition: the diverse operations and the prospect of applying a cognitive neuroscience perspective. Methods. 2007;42(1):38-48.
Abraham, A., & Windmann, S. (2007). Creative cognition: the diverse operations and the prospect of applying a cognitive neuroscience perspective. Methods (San Diego, Calif.), 42(1), pp. 38-48.
Abraham A, Windmann S. Creative Cognition: the Diverse Operations and the Prospect of Applying a Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Methods. 2007;42(1):38-48. PubMed PMID: 17434414.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Creative cognition: the diverse operations and the prospect of applying a cognitive neuroscience perspective. AU - Abraham,Anna, AU - Windmann,Sabine, PY - 2006/09/13/received PY - 2006/12/08/revised PY - 2006/12/11/accepted PY - 2007/4/17/pubmed PY - 2007/6/22/medline PY - 2007/4/17/entrez SP - 38 EP - 48 JF - Methods (San Diego, Calif.) JO - Methods VL - 42 IS - 1 N2 - Creativity is defined quite simply as "the ability to create" in most lexicons, but, in reality, this is a complex and heterogeneous construct about which there is much to be discovered. The cognitive approach to investigating creativity recognizes and seeks to understand this complexity by investigating the component processes involved in creative thinking. The cognitive neuroscience approach, which has only limitedly been applied in the study of creativity, should ideally build on these ideas in uncovering the neural substrates of these processes. Following an introduction into the early experimental ideas and the cognitive approach to creativity, we discuss the theoretical background and behavioral methods for testing various processes of creative cognition, including conceptual expansion, the constraining influence of examples, creative imagery and insight. The complex relations between the underlying component processes of originality and relevance across these tasks are presented thereafter. We then outline how some of these conceptual distinctions can be evaluated by neuroscientific evidence and elaborate on the neuropsychological approach in the study of creativity. Given the current state of affairs, our recommendation is that despite methodological difficulties that are associated with investigating creativity, adopting the cognitive neuroscience perspective is a highly promising framework for validating and expanding on the critical issues that have been raised in this paper. SN - 1046-2023 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17434414/Creative_cognition:_the_diverse_operations_and_the_prospect_of_applying_a_cognitive_neuroscience_perspective_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1046-2023(06)00299-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -