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Are childhood socio-economic circumstances related to coronary heart disease risk? Findings from a population-based study of older men.
Int J Epidemiol 2007; 36(3):560-6IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The independent influence of childhood social circumstances on health in later life remains uncertain. We examined the extent to which childhood socio-economic circumstances are related to the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in older British men, taking account of adult social class and behavioural risk factors.

METHODS

A socio-economically representative sample of 5552 British men (52-74 years) with retrospective assessment of childhood socio-economic circumstances (father's occupation and childhood household amenities) who were followed up for CHD (fatal and non-fatal) for 12 years.

RESULTS

Men whose childhood social class was manual had an increased hazard ratio (HR) 1.34 (95% CI 1.11-1.63)-this effect was diminished when adjusted for adult social class and adult behavioural risk factors (cigarette smoking, alcohol, physical activity and body weight) (HR 1.19; 95% CI 0.97-1.46). Men whose family did not own a car in their childhood were at increased CHD risk even after adjustments for adult social class and behaviours (HR 1.35, 95% CI 1.04-1.75). Men with combined exposure to both childhood and adult manual social class had the highest risk of CHD (HR 1.51; 95% CI 1.19-1.91); this was substantially reduced by adjustment for adult behavioural risk factors (adjusted HR 1.28; 95% CI 0.99-1.65).

CONCLUSIONS

Less affluent socio-economic conditions in childhood may have a modest persisting influence on risk of CHD in later life.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Primary Care and Population Sciences, Royal Free Hospital and University College Medical School, Rowland Hill Street, London, UK. s.ramsay@pcps.ucl.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17440028

Citation

Ramsay, Sheena E., et al. "Are Childhood Socio-economic Circumstances Related to Coronary Heart Disease Risk? Findings From a Population-based Study of Older Men." International Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 36, no. 3, 2007, pp. 560-6.
Ramsay SE, Whincup PH, Morris RW, et al. Are childhood socio-economic circumstances related to coronary heart disease risk? Findings from a population-based study of older men. Int J Epidemiol. 2007;36(3):560-6.
Ramsay, S. E., Whincup, P. H., Morris, R. W., Lennon, L. T., & Wannamethee, S. G. (2007). Are childhood socio-economic circumstances related to coronary heart disease risk? Findings from a population-based study of older men. International Journal of Epidemiology, 36(3), pp. 560-6.
Ramsay SE, et al. Are Childhood Socio-economic Circumstances Related to Coronary Heart Disease Risk? Findings From a Population-based Study of Older Men. Int J Epidemiol. 2007;36(3):560-6. PubMed PMID: 17440028.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Are childhood socio-economic circumstances related to coronary heart disease risk? Findings from a population-based study of older men. AU - Ramsay,Sheena E, AU - Whincup,Peter H, AU - Morris,Richard W, AU - Lennon,Lucy T, AU - Wannamethee,S G, Y1 - 2007/04/17/ PY - 2007/4/19/pubmed PY - 2007/11/14/medline PY - 2007/4/19/entrez SP - 560 EP - 6 JF - International journal of epidemiology JO - Int J Epidemiol VL - 36 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: The independent influence of childhood social circumstances on health in later life remains uncertain. We examined the extent to which childhood socio-economic circumstances are related to the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in older British men, taking account of adult social class and behavioural risk factors. METHODS: A socio-economically representative sample of 5552 British men (52-74 years) with retrospective assessment of childhood socio-economic circumstances (father's occupation and childhood household amenities) who were followed up for CHD (fatal and non-fatal) for 12 years. RESULTS: Men whose childhood social class was manual had an increased hazard ratio (HR) 1.34 (95% CI 1.11-1.63)-this effect was diminished when adjusted for adult social class and adult behavioural risk factors (cigarette smoking, alcohol, physical activity and body weight) (HR 1.19; 95% CI 0.97-1.46). Men whose family did not own a car in their childhood were at increased CHD risk even after adjustments for adult social class and behaviours (HR 1.35, 95% CI 1.04-1.75). Men with combined exposure to both childhood and adult manual social class had the highest risk of CHD (HR 1.51; 95% CI 1.19-1.91); this was substantially reduced by adjustment for adult behavioural risk factors (adjusted HR 1.28; 95% CI 0.99-1.65). CONCLUSIONS: Less affluent socio-economic conditions in childhood may have a modest persisting influence on risk of CHD in later life. SN - 0300-5771 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17440028/Are_childhood_socio_economic_circumstances_related_to_coronary_heart_disease_risk_Findings_from_a_population_based_study_of_older_men_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ije/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ije/dym060 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -