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Exposure to fine particles (PM2.5 and PM1) and black smoke in the general population: personal, indoor, and outdoor levels.
J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol. 2007 Nov; 17(7):613-24.JE

Abstract

Personal exposure to PM(2.5) and PM(1), together with indoor and residential outdoor levels, was measured in the general adult population (30 subjects, 23-51 years of age) of Gothenburg, Sweden. Simultaneously, urban background concentrations of PM(2.5) were monitored with an EPA WINS impactor. The 24-h samples were gravimetrically analyzed for mass concentration and black smoke (BS) using a smokestain reflectometer. Median levels of PM(2.5) were 8.4 microg/m(3) (personal), 8.6 microg/m(3) (indoor), 6.4 microg/m(3) (residential outdoor), and 5.6 microg/m(3) (urban background). Personal exposure to PM(1) was 5.4 microg/m(3), while PM(1) indoor and outdoor levels were 6.2 and 5.2 microg/m(3), respectively. In non-smokers, personal exposure to PM(2.5) was significantly higher than were residential outdoor levels. BS absorption coefficients were fairly similar for all microenvironments (0.4-0.5 10(-5) m(-1)). Personal exposure to particulate matter (PM) and BS was well correlated with indoor levels, and there was an acceptable agreement between personal exposure and urban background concentrations for PM(2.5) and BS(2.5) (r(s)=0.61 and 0.65, respectively). PM(1) made up a considerable amount (70-80%) of PM(2.5) in all microenvironments. Levels of BS were higher outdoors than indoors and higher during the fall compared with spring. The correlations between particle mass and BS for both PM(2.5) vs. BS(2.5) and PM(1) versus BS(1) were weak for all microenvironments including personal exposure. The urban background station provided a good estimate of residential outdoor levels of PM(2.5) and BS(2.5) within the city (r(s)=0.90 and 0.77, respectively). Outdoor levels were considerably affected by long-range transported air pollution, which was not found for personal exposure or indoor levels. The within-individual (day-to-day) variability dominated for personal exposure to both PM(2.5) and BS(2.5) in non-smokers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital and Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden. sandra.johannesson@amm.gu.seNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17440486

Citation

Johannesson, Sandra, et al. "Exposure to Fine Particles (PM2.5 and PM1) and Black Smoke in the General Population: Personal, Indoor, and Outdoor Levels." Journal of Exposure Science & Environmental Epidemiology, vol. 17, no. 7, 2007, pp. 613-24.
Johannesson S, Gustafson P, Molnár P, et al. Exposure to fine particles (PM2.5 and PM1) and black smoke in the general population: personal, indoor, and outdoor levels. J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol. 2007;17(7):613-24.
Johannesson, S., Gustafson, P., Molnár, P., Barregard, L., & Sällsten, G. (2007). Exposure to fine particles (PM2.5 and PM1) and black smoke in the general population: personal, indoor, and outdoor levels. Journal of Exposure Science & Environmental Epidemiology, 17(7), 613-24.
Johannesson S, et al. Exposure to Fine Particles (PM2.5 and PM1) and Black Smoke in the General Population: Personal, Indoor, and Outdoor Levels. J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol. 2007;17(7):613-24. PubMed PMID: 17440486.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Exposure to fine particles (PM2.5 and PM1) and black smoke in the general population: personal, indoor, and outdoor levels. AU - Johannesson,Sandra, AU - Gustafson,Pernilla, AU - Molnár,Peter, AU - Barregard,Lars, AU - Sällsten,Gerd, Y1 - 2007/04/18/ PY - 2007/4/19/pubmed PY - 2008/2/27/medline PY - 2007/4/19/entrez SP - 613 EP - 24 JF - Journal of exposure science & environmental epidemiology JO - J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol VL - 17 IS - 7 N2 - Personal exposure to PM(2.5) and PM(1), together with indoor and residential outdoor levels, was measured in the general adult population (30 subjects, 23-51 years of age) of Gothenburg, Sweden. Simultaneously, urban background concentrations of PM(2.5) were monitored with an EPA WINS impactor. The 24-h samples were gravimetrically analyzed for mass concentration and black smoke (BS) using a smokestain reflectometer. Median levels of PM(2.5) were 8.4 microg/m(3) (personal), 8.6 microg/m(3) (indoor), 6.4 microg/m(3) (residential outdoor), and 5.6 microg/m(3) (urban background). Personal exposure to PM(1) was 5.4 microg/m(3), while PM(1) indoor and outdoor levels were 6.2 and 5.2 microg/m(3), respectively. In non-smokers, personal exposure to PM(2.5) was significantly higher than were residential outdoor levels. BS absorption coefficients were fairly similar for all microenvironments (0.4-0.5 10(-5) m(-1)). Personal exposure to particulate matter (PM) and BS was well correlated with indoor levels, and there was an acceptable agreement between personal exposure and urban background concentrations for PM(2.5) and BS(2.5) (r(s)=0.61 and 0.65, respectively). PM(1) made up a considerable amount (70-80%) of PM(2.5) in all microenvironments. Levels of BS were higher outdoors than indoors and higher during the fall compared with spring. The correlations between particle mass and BS for both PM(2.5) vs. BS(2.5) and PM(1) versus BS(1) were weak for all microenvironments including personal exposure. The urban background station provided a good estimate of residential outdoor levels of PM(2.5) and BS(2.5) within the city (r(s)=0.90 and 0.77, respectively). Outdoor levels were considerably affected by long-range transported air pollution, which was not found for personal exposure or indoor levels. The within-individual (day-to-day) variability dominated for personal exposure to both PM(2.5) and BS(2.5) in non-smokers. SN - 1559-0631 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17440486/Exposure_to_fine_particles__PM2_5_and_PM1__and_black_smoke_in_the_general_population:_personal_indoor_and_outdoor_levels_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.jes.7500562 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -