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Ultrasound mediated transdermal insulin delivery in pigs using a lightweight transducer.
Pharm Res. 2007 Jul; 24(7):1396-401.PR

Abstract

PURPOSE

In previous studies, ultrasound mediated transdermal drug delivery has shown a promising potential as a method for noninvasive drug administration. For prospective future human application, this study was designed to determine the feasibility of lightweight cymbal transducer array as a practical device for noninvasive transdermal insulin delivery in large pigs.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Six Yorkshire pigs (100-140 lbs) were divided into two groups. As the control (n = 3), the first group did not receive any ultrasound exposure with the insulin. The second group (n = 3) was treated with ultrasound and insulin at 20 kHz with an I(sptp) = 100 mW/cm(2) at a 20% duty cycle for 60 min. With the pigs in lateral recumbency after anesthesia, the ultrasound transducer with insulin was placed on the axillary area of the pig. At the beginning and every 15 min up to 90 min, the blood glucose level was determined using a glucose monitoring system. To compare the results of individual animals, the change of blood glucose level was normalized to each animal's initial glucose value at the start of the experiment.

RESULTS

Although each animal had a different initial glucose level, the mean and standard error for the six animals was 146 +/- 13 mg/dl. For the control group, the blood glucose level increased to 31 +/- 21 mg/dl compared to the initial baseline over the 90 min experiment. However for the ultrasound with insulin treated group, the glucose level decreased to -72 +/- 5 mg/dl at 60 min (p < 0.05) and continued to decrease to -91 +/- 23 mg/dl in 90 min (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSION

The results indicate the feasibility of ultrasound mediated transdermal insulin delivery using the cymbal transducer array in animal with a similar size and weight to a human. Based on these result, the cymbal array has potential as a practical ultrasound system for noninvasive transdermal insulin delivery for diabetes management.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Bioengineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Evaluation Study
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17443398

Citation

Park, E J., et al. "Ultrasound Mediated Transdermal Insulin Delivery in Pigs Using a Lightweight Transducer." Pharmaceutical Research, vol. 24, no. 7, 2007, pp. 1396-401.
Park EJ, Werner J, Smith NB. Ultrasound mediated transdermal insulin delivery in pigs using a lightweight transducer. Pharm Res. 2007;24(7):1396-401.
Park, E. J., Werner, J., & Smith, N. B. (2007). Ultrasound mediated transdermal insulin delivery in pigs using a lightweight transducer. Pharmaceutical Research, 24(7), 1396-401.
Park EJ, Werner J, Smith NB. Ultrasound Mediated Transdermal Insulin Delivery in Pigs Using a Lightweight Transducer. Pharm Res. 2007;24(7):1396-401. PubMed PMID: 17443398.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ultrasound mediated transdermal insulin delivery in pigs using a lightweight transducer. AU - Park,E J, AU - Werner,Jacob, AU - Smith,Nadine Barrie, Y1 - 2007/04/19/ PY - 2007/02/14/received PY - 2007/03/26/accepted PY - 2007/4/20/pubmed PY - 2007/7/21/medline PY - 2007/4/20/entrez SP - 1396 EP - 401 JF - Pharmaceutical research JO - Pharm Res VL - 24 IS - 7 N2 - PURPOSE: In previous studies, ultrasound mediated transdermal drug delivery has shown a promising potential as a method for noninvasive drug administration. For prospective future human application, this study was designed to determine the feasibility of lightweight cymbal transducer array as a practical device for noninvasive transdermal insulin delivery in large pigs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Six Yorkshire pigs (100-140 lbs) were divided into two groups. As the control (n = 3), the first group did not receive any ultrasound exposure with the insulin. The second group (n = 3) was treated with ultrasound and insulin at 20 kHz with an I(sptp) = 100 mW/cm(2) at a 20% duty cycle for 60 min. With the pigs in lateral recumbency after anesthesia, the ultrasound transducer with insulin was placed on the axillary area of the pig. At the beginning and every 15 min up to 90 min, the blood glucose level was determined using a glucose monitoring system. To compare the results of individual animals, the change of blood glucose level was normalized to each animal's initial glucose value at the start of the experiment. RESULTS: Although each animal had a different initial glucose level, the mean and standard error for the six animals was 146 +/- 13 mg/dl. For the control group, the blood glucose level increased to 31 +/- 21 mg/dl compared to the initial baseline over the 90 min experiment. However for the ultrasound with insulin treated group, the glucose level decreased to -72 +/- 5 mg/dl at 60 min (p < 0.05) and continued to decrease to -91 +/- 23 mg/dl in 90 min (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: The results indicate the feasibility of ultrasound mediated transdermal insulin delivery using the cymbal transducer array in animal with a similar size and weight to a human. Based on these result, the cymbal array has potential as a practical ultrasound system for noninvasive transdermal insulin delivery for diabetes management. SN - 0724-8741 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17443398/Ultrasound_mediated_transdermal_insulin_delivery_in_pigs_using_a_lightweight_transducer_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s11095-007-9306-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -