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Pancreatitis: prevalence and risk factors among male veterans in a detoxification program.
Pancreas 2007; 34(4):390-8P

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To determine the prevalence of pancreatitis and associated risk factors among heavy-drinking veterans.

METHODS

At a large Veterans Administration Outpatient Detoxification Program (ODP) that systematically collects risk information, 1409 black and white male veterans with International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes for alcohol abuse enrolling in the ODP from January 2002 to December 2003 were identified. Among these patients, pancreatitis at any time (before the ODP admission or occurring through June 2005) was identified using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes. Cases were verified by chart review. Logistic regression analyses were used for multivariable analyses.

RESULTS

Overall, history of smoking (89.6%) and current or past drug use (90.1%) were very common, whereas intravenous drug use (22.3%) was less so. Although 87 (6.2%) subjects had pancreatitis codes (acute, 50; chronic, 15; both, 22), chart review verified only 42 cases (acute, 29; chronic, 5; both, 8) for a 3% prevalence. Alcohol appeared to be the definite etiology in 39 of these 42 patients. In bivariate analyses, patients with pancreatitis were older, had more substance abuse admissions, reported a significantly heavier current alcohol use, and lower drug dependence (each P < 0.05). In multivariable models, alcoholic pancreatitis was associated positively with age (odds ratio, 1.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.12) and number of substance abuse admissions (odds ratio, 1.08; 95% confidence interval, 0.995-1.18; P = 0.06).

CONCLUSIONS

In this high-risk population of heavy drinkers, the prevalence of pancreatitis is at least 3%. Our study provides preliminary data regarding potential cofactors for pancreatitis in heavy drinkers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, College of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA. yadavd@dom.pitt.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17446836

Citation

Yadav, Dhiraj, et al. "Pancreatitis: Prevalence and Risk Factors Among Male Veterans in a Detoxification Program." Pancreas, vol. 34, no. 4, 2007, pp. 390-8.
Yadav D, Eigenbrodt ML, Briggs MJ, et al. Pancreatitis: prevalence and risk factors among male veterans in a detoxification program. Pancreas. 2007;34(4):390-8.
Yadav, D., Eigenbrodt, M. L., Briggs, M. J., Williams, D. K., & Wiseman, E. J. (2007). Pancreatitis: prevalence and risk factors among male veterans in a detoxification program. Pancreas, 34(4), pp. 390-8.
Yadav D, et al. Pancreatitis: Prevalence and Risk Factors Among Male Veterans in a Detoxification Program. Pancreas. 2007;34(4):390-8. PubMed PMID: 17446836.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pancreatitis: prevalence and risk factors among male veterans in a detoxification program. AU - Yadav,Dhiraj, AU - Eigenbrodt,Marsha L, AU - Briggs,Margaret J, AU - Williams,D Keith, AU - Wiseman,Eve J, PY - 2007/4/21/pubmed PY - 2007/5/23/medline PY - 2007/4/21/entrez SP - 390 EP - 8 JF - Pancreas JO - Pancreas VL - 34 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of pancreatitis and associated risk factors among heavy-drinking veterans. METHODS: At a large Veterans Administration Outpatient Detoxification Program (ODP) that systematically collects risk information, 1409 black and white male veterans with International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes for alcohol abuse enrolling in the ODP from January 2002 to December 2003 were identified. Among these patients, pancreatitis at any time (before the ODP admission or occurring through June 2005) was identified using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes. Cases were verified by chart review. Logistic regression analyses were used for multivariable analyses. RESULTS: Overall, history of smoking (89.6%) and current or past drug use (90.1%) were very common, whereas intravenous drug use (22.3%) was less so. Although 87 (6.2%) subjects had pancreatitis codes (acute, 50; chronic, 15; both, 22), chart review verified only 42 cases (acute, 29; chronic, 5; both, 8) for a 3% prevalence. Alcohol appeared to be the definite etiology in 39 of these 42 patients. In bivariate analyses, patients with pancreatitis were older, had more substance abuse admissions, reported a significantly heavier current alcohol use, and lower drug dependence (each P < 0.05). In multivariable models, alcoholic pancreatitis was associated positively with age (odds ratio, 1.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.12) and number of substance abuse admissions (odds ratio, 1.08; 95% confidence interval, 0.995-1.18; P = 0.06). CONCLUSIONS: In this high-risk population of heavy drinkers, the prevalence of pancreatitis is at least 3%. Our study provides preliminary data regarding potential cofactors for pancreatitis in heavy drinkers. SN - 1536-4828 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17446836/Pancreatitis:_prevalence_and_risk_factors_among_male_veterans_in_a_detoxification_program_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=17446836 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -