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Development and validation of Aviation Causal Contributors for Error Reporting Systems (ACCERS).
Hum Factors. 2007 Apr; 49(2):185-99.HF

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This investigation sought to develop a reliable and valid classification system for identifying and classifying the underlying causes of pilot errors reported under the Aviation Safety Action Program (ASAP).

BACKGROUND

ASAP is a voluntary safety program that air carriers may establish to study pilot and crew performance on the line. In ASAP programs, similar to the Aviation Safety Reporting System, pilots self-report incidents by filing a short text description of the event. The identification of contributors to errors is critical if organizations are to improve human performance, yet it is difficult for analysts to extract this information from text narratives. A taxonomy was needed that could be used by pilots to classify the causes of errors.

METHOD

After completing a thorough literature review, pilot interviews and a card-sorting task were conducted in Studies 1 and 2 to develop the initial structure of the Aviation Causal Contributors for Event Reporting Systems (ACCERS) taxonomy. The reliability and utility of ACCERS was then tested in studies 3a and 3b by having pilots independently classify the primary and secondary causes of ASAP reports.

RESULTS

The results provided initial evidence for the internal and external validity of ACCERS. Pilots were found to demonstrate adequate levels of agreement with respect to their category classifications.

CONCLUSIONS

ACCERS appears to be a useful system for studying human error captured under pilot ASAP reports. Future work should focus on how ACCERS is organized and whether it can be used or modified to classify human error in ASAP programs for other aviation-related job categories such as dispatchers.

APPLICATION

Potential applications of this research include systems in which individuals self-report errors and that attempt to extract and classify the causes of those events.

Authors+Show Affiliations

American Institutes for Research, 1000 Thomas Jefferson St., NW, Washington, DC 20007, USA. dbaker@air.orgNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Validation Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17447662

Citation

Baker, David P., and Kelley J. Krokos. "Development and Validation of Aviation Causal Contributors for Error Reporting Systems (ACCERS)." Human Factors, vol. 49, no. 2, 2007, pp. 185-99.
Baker DP, Krokos KJ. Development and validation of Aviation Causal Contributors for Error Reporting Systems (ACCERS). Hum Factors. 2007;49(2):185-99.
Baker, D. P., & Krokos, K. J. (2007). Development and validation of Aviation Causal Contributors for Error Reporting Systems (ACCERS). Human Factors, 49(2), 185-99.
Baker DP, Krokos KJ. Development and Validation of Aviation Causal Contributors for Error Reporting Systems (ACCERS). Hum Factors. 2007;49(2):185-99. PubMed PMID: 17447662.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Development and validation of Aviation Causal Contributors for Error Reporting Systems (ACCERS). AU - Baker,David P, AU - Krokos,Kelley J, PY - 2007/4/24/pubmed PY - 2007/6/9/medline PY - 2007/4/24/entrez SP - 185 EP - 99 JF - Human factors JO - Hum Factors VL - 49 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: This investigation sought to develop a reliable and valid classification system for identifying and classifying the underlying causes of pilot errors reported under the Aviation Safety Action Program (ASAP). BACKGROUND: ASAP is a voluntary safety program that air carriers may establish to study pilot and crew performance on the line. In ASAP programs, similar to the Aviation Safety Reporting System, pilots self-report incidents by filing a short text description of the event. The identification of contributors to errors is critical if organizations are to improve human performance, yet it is difficult for analysts to extract this information from text narratives. A taxonomy was needed that could be used by pilots to classify the causes of errors. METHOD: After completing a thorough literature review, pilot interviews and a card-sorting task were conducted in Studies 1 and 2 to develop the initial structure of the Aviation Causal Contributors for Event Reporting Systems (ACCERS) taxonomy. The reliability and utility of ACCERS was then tested in studies 3a and 3b by having pilots independently classify the primary and secondary causes of ASAP reports. RESULTS: The results provided initial evidence for the internal and external validity of ACCERS. Pilots were found to demonstrate adequate levels of agreement with respect to their category classifications. CONCLUSIONS: ACCERS appears to be a useful system for studying human error captured under pilot ASAP reports. Future work should focus on how ACCERS is organized and whether it can be used or modified to classify human error in ASAP programs for other aviation-related job categories such as dispatchers. APPLICATION: Potential applications of this research include systems in which individuals self-report errors and that attempt to extract and classify the causes of those events. SN - 0018-7208 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17447662/Development_and_validation_of_Aviation_Causal_Contributors_for_Error_Reporting_Systems__ACCERS__ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1518/001872007X312432?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -