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Human error and commercial aviation accidents: an analysis using the human factors analysis and classification system.
Hum Factors. 2007 Apr; 49(2):227-42.HF

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to extend previous examinations of aviation accidents to include specific aircrew, environmental, supervisory, and organizational factors associated with two types of commercial aviation (air carrier and commuter/ on-demand) accidents using the Human Factors Analysis and Classification System (HFACS).

BACKGROUND

HFACS is a theoretically based tool for investigating and analyzing human error associated with accidents and incidents. Previous research has shown that HFACS can be reliably used to identify human factors trends associated with military and general aviation accidents.

METHOD

Using data obtained from both the National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration, 6 pilot-raters classified aircrew, supervisory, organizational, and environmental causal factors associated with 1020 commercial aviation accidents that occurred over a 13-year period.

RESULTS

The majority of accident causal factors were attributed to aircrew and the environment, with decidedly fewer associated with supervisory and organizational causes. Comparisons were made between HFACS causal categories and traditional situational variables such as visual conditions, injury severity, and regional differences.

CONCLUSION

These data will provide support for the continuation, modification, and/or development of interventions aimed at commercial aviation safety.

APPLICATION

HFACS provides a tool for assessing human factors associated with accidents and incidents.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Clemson University, Department of Industrial Engineering, 121 Freeman Hall, Box 340920, Clemson, SC 29634-0920, USA. hfeng@clemson.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17447665

Citation

Shappell, Scott, et al. "Human Error and Commercial Aviation Accidents: an Analysis Using the Human Factors Analysis and Classification System." Human Factors, vol. 49, no. 2, 2007, pp. 227-42.
Shappell S, Detwiler C, Holcomb K, et al. Human error and commercial aviation accidents: an analysis using the human factors analysis and classification system. Hum Factors. 2007;49(2):227-42.
Shappell, S., Detwiler, C., Holcomb, K., Hackworth, C., Boquet, A., & Wiegmann, D. A. (2007). Human error and commercial aviation accidents: an analysis using the human factors analysis and classification system. Human Factors, 49(2), 227-42.
Shappell S, et al. Human Error and Commercial Aviation Accidents: an Analysis Using the Human Factors Analysis and Classification System. Hum Factors. 2007;49(2):227-42. PubMed PMID: 17447665.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Human error and commercial aviation accidents: an analysis using the human factors analysis and classification system. AU - Shappell,Scott, AU - Detwiler,Cristy, AU - Holcomb,Kali, AU - Hackworth,Carla, AU - Boquet,Albert, AU - Wiegmann,Douglas A, PY - 2007/4/24/pubmed PY - 2007/6/9/medline PY - 2007/4/24/entrez SP - 227 EP - 42 JF - Human factors JO - Hum Factors VL - 49 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to extend previous examinations of aviation accidents to include specific aircrew, environmental, supervisory, and organizational factors associated with two types of commercial aviation (air carrier and commuter/ on-demand) accidents using the Human Factors Analysis and Classification System (HFACS). BACKGROUND: HFACS is a theoretically based tool for investigating and analyzing human error associated with accidents and incidents. Previous research has shown that HFACS can be reliably used to identify human factors trends associated with military and general aviation accidents. METHOD: Using data obtained from both the National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration, 6 pilot-raters classified aircrew, supervisory, organizational, and environmental causal factors associated with 1020 commercial aviation accidents that occurred over a 13-year period. RESULTS: The majority of accident causal factors were attributed to aircrew and the environment, with decidedly fewer associated with supervisory and organizational causes. Comparisons were made between HFACS causal categories and traditional situational variables such as visual conditions, injury severity, and regional differences. CONCLUSION: These data will provide support for the continuation, modification, and/or development of interventions aimed at commercial aviation safety. APPLICATION: HFACS provides a tool for assessing human factors associated with accidents and incidents. SN - 0018-7208 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17447665/Human_error_and_commercial_aviation_accidents:_an_analysis_using_the_human_factors_analysis_and_classification_system_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1518/001872007X312469?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -