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Thin-section diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the brain with parallel imaging.
Acta Radiol. 2007 May; 48(4):456-63.AR

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Thin-section diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is known to improve lesion detectability, with long imaging time as a drawback. Parallel imaging (PI) is a technique that takes advantage of spatial sensitivity information inherent in an array of multiple-receiver surface coils to partially replace time-consuming spatial encoding and reduce imaging time.

PURPOSE

To prospectively evaluate a 3-mm-thin-section DWI technique combined with PI by means of qualitative and quantitative measurements.

MATERIAL AND METHODS

30 patients underwent conventional echo-planar (EPI) DWI (5-mm section thickness, 1-mm intersection gap) without parallel imaging, and thin-section EPI-DWI with PI (3-mm section thickness, 0-mm intersection gap) for a b value of 1000 s/mm(2), with an imaging time of 40 and 80 s, respectively. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), relative signal intensity (rSI), and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were measured over a lesion-free cerebral region on both series by two radiologists. A quality score was assigned for each set of images to assess the image quality. When a brain lesion was present, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and corresponding ADC were also measured. Student t-tests were used for statistical analysis.

RESULTS

Mean SNR values of the normal brain were 33.61+/-4.35 and 32.98+/-7.19 for conventional and thin-slice DWI (P>0.05), respectively. Relative signal intensities were significantly higher on thin-section DWI (P<0.05). Mean ADCs of the brain obtained by both techniques were comparable (P>0.05). Quality scores and overall lesion CNR were found to be higher in thin-section DWI with parallel imaging.

CONCLUSION

A thin-section technique combined with PI improves rSI, CNR, and image quality without compromising SNR and ADC measurements in an acceptable imaging time.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Radiology, Gazi University School of Medicine, Besevler-Ankara, Turkey. yusuf@tr.netNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17453529

Citation

Oner, A Y., et al. "Thin-section Diffusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain With Parallel Imaging." Acta Radiologica (Stockholm, Sweden : 1987), vol. 48, no. 4, 2007, pp. 456-63.
Oner AY, Celik H, Tali T, et al. Thin-section diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the brain with parallel imaging. Acta Radiol. 2007;48(4):456-63.
Oner, A. Y., Celik, H., Tali, T., Akpek, S., & Tokgoz, N. (2007). Thin-section diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the brain with parallel imaging. Acta Radiologica (Stockholm, Sweden : 1987), 48(4), 456-63.
Oner AY, et al. Thin-section Diffusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain With Parallel Imaging. Acta Radiol. 2007;48(4):456-63. PubMed PMID: 17453529.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Thin-section diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the brain with parallel imaging. AU - Oner,A Y, AU - Celik,H, AU - Tali,T, AU - Akpek,S, AU - Tokgoz,N, PY - 2007/4/25/pubmed PY - 2007/7/20/medline PY - 2007/4/25/entrez SP - 456 EP - 63 JF - Acta radiologica (Stockholm, Sweden : 1987) JO - Acta Radiol VL - 48 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Thin-section diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is known to improve lesion detectability, with long imaging time as a drawback. Parallel imaging (PI) is a technique that takes advantage of spatial sensitivity information inherent in an array of multiple-receiver surface coils to partially replace time-consuming spatial encoding and reduce imaging time. PURPOSE: To prospectively evaluate a 3-mm-thin-section DWI technique combined with PI by means of qualitative and quantitative measurements. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 30 patients underwent conventional echo-planar (EPI) DWI (5-mm section thickness, 1-mm intersection gap) without parallel imaging, and thin-section EPI-DWI with PI (3-mm section thickness, 0-mm intersection gap) for a b value of 1000 s/mm(2), with an imaging time of 40 and 80 s, respectively. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), relative signal intensity (rSI), and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were measured over a lesion-free cerebral region on both series by two radiologists. A quality score was assigned for each set of images to assess the image quality. When a brain lesion was present, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and corresponding ADC were also measured. Student t-tests were used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: Mean SNR values of the normal brain were 33.61+/-4.35 and 32.98+/-7.19 for conventional and thin-slice DWI (P>0.05), respectively. Relative signal intensities were significantly higher on thin-section DWI (P<0.05). Mean ADCs of the brain obtained by both techniques were comparable (P>0.05). Quality scores and overall lesion CNR were found to be higher in thin-section DWI with parallel imaging. CONCLUSION: A thin-section technique combined with PI improves rSI, CNR, and image quality without compromising SNR and ADC measurements in an acceptable imaging time. SN - 0284-1851 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17453529/Thin_section_diffusion_weighted_magnetic_resonance_imaging_of_the_brain_with_parallel_imaging_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1080/02841850701297506?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -