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Self-reported perceptions of Registered Nurses working in Australian hospitals.
J Nurs Manag. 2007 May; 15(4):403-13.JN

Abstract

AIM

The purpose of this study is to develop an understanding of work environments by analysing the perceptions of a sample of Registered Nurses (RNs).

BACKGROUND

Within the context of high staff turnover and a shortage of nurses in the health workforce, it is important that we understand how nurses perceive their work context and view the organisational factors that influence their attitudes towards their workplace.

METHODS

Data was collected using a 160-question survey instrument seeking information from RNs in relation to work and perceptions of the work environment and the organisation. The sample was recruited from a convenience sample of three acute hospitals in Queensland, Australia. A response rate of 41% was achieved (n=343).

RESULTS

Respondents across the three survey sites identified a number of variables that had particular impact on their working lives. Team interaction, providing good patient care, communication, and abuse towards RNs elicited strong responses by the study respondents. As well, organisational direction, strategy and management returned strong negative responses. In responding to the questions related to personal and organisational morale it was clear that respondents saw them as two distinct concepts.

CONCLUSIONS

The results of this study have implications for nurse managers in terms of understanding the nursing workforce as well as key organisational factors that have both positive and negative influences on the perceptions of nurses.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Health Services Management, School of Public Health, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. g.day@qut.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17456169

Citation

Day, Gary, et al. "Self-reported Perceptions of Registered Nurses Working in Australian Hospitals." Journal of Nursing Management, vol. 15, no. 4, 2007, pp. 403-13.
Day G, Minichiello V, Madison J. Self-reported perceptions of Registered Nurses working in Australian hospitals. J Nurs Manag. 2007;15(4):403-13.
Day, G., Minichiello, V., & Madison, J. (2007). Self-reported perceptions of Registered Nurses working in Australian hospitals. Journal of Nursing Management, 15(4), 403-13.
Day G, Minichiello V, Madison J. Self-reported Perceptions of Registered Nurses Working in Australian Hospitals. J Nurs Manag. 2007;15(4):403-13. PubMed PMID: 17456169.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Self-reported perceptions of Registered Nurses working in Australian hospitals. AU - Day,Gary, AU - Minichiello,Victor, AU - Madison,Jeanne, PY - 2007/4/26/pubmed PY - 2007/6/19/medline PY - 2007/4/26/entrez SP - 403 EP - 13 JF - Journal of nursing management JO - J Nurs Manag VL - 15 IS - 4 N2 - AIM: The purpose of this study is to develop an understanding of work environments by analysing the perceptions of a sample of Registered Nurses (RNs). BACKGROUND: Within the context of high staff turnover and a shortage of nurses in the health workforce, it is important that we understand how nurses perceive their work context and view the organisational factors that influence their attitudes towards their workplace. METHODS: Data was collected using a 160-question survey instrument seeking information from RNs in relation to work and perceptions of the work environment and the organisation. The sample was recruited from a convenience sample of three acute hospitals in Queensland, Australia. A response rate of 41% was achieved (n=343). RESULTS: Respondents across the three survey sites identified a number of variables that had particular impact on their working lives. Team interaction, providing good patient care, communication, and abuse towards RNs elicited strong responses by the study respondents. As well, organisational direction, strategy and management returned strong negative responses. In responding to the questions related to personal and organisational morale it was clear that respondents saw them as two distinct concepts. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study have implications for nurse managers in terms of understanding the nursing workforce as well as key organisational factors that have both positive and negative influences on the perceptions of nurses. SN - 0966-0429 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17456169/Self_reported_perceptions_of_Registered_Nurses_working_in_Australian_hospitals_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2834.2007.00681.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -